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Ultra-marathon running


Knechtle, B; Nikolaidis, P (2015). Ultra-marathon running. Dansk Sportsmedicin, 19(4):6-10.

Abstract

An ultra-marathon can be defined as any running performance lasting for longer than six hours and/or longer than the classical marathon distance of 42.195 km. An ultra-marathon can be held as a single stage race in distance- and time-limited races and as a multi-stage race. The longest ultra-marathons cover several thousands of kilometres and can endure for up to two months. Ultra-marathoners are generally married and well-educated men at the age of ~45 years. Female ultra-marathoners account for ~20%. Ultra-marathoners differ from marathoners regarding anthropometry and training. Ultra-marathoners complete more running kilometres in training than marathoners do, but they run more slowly during training than marathoners. Previous experience is the most important predictor variable for a successful ultra-marathon performance apart from specific anthropometric characteristics (i.e. low body mass index and low body fat) and training characteristics (i.e. high volume and speed during running training). Women compete slower than men in ultra-marathon running; however, they were able to reduce the sex gap in recent years. The fastest ultra-marathon race times are generally achieved at 35-45 years for both women and men.

Abstract

An ultra-marathon can be defined as any running performance lasting for longer than six hours and/or longer than the classical marathon distance of 42.195 km. An ultra-marathon can be held as a single stage race in distance- and time-limited races and as a multi-stage race. The longest ultra-marathons cover several thousands of kilometres and can endure for up to two months. Ultra-marathoners are generally married and well-educated men at the age of ~45 years. Female ultra-marathoners account for ~20%. Ultra-marathoners differ from marathoners regarding anthropometry and training. Ultra-marathoners complete more running kilometres in training than marathoners do, but they run more slowly during training than marathoners. Previous experience is the most important predictor variable for a successful ultra-marathon performance apart from specific anthropometric characteristics (i.e. low body mass index and low body fat) and training characteristics (i.e. high volume and speed during running training). Women compete slower than men in ultra-marathon running; however, they were able to reduce the sex gap in recent years. The fastest ultra-marathon race times are generally achieved at 35-45 years for both women and men.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:27 Nov 2015 10:15
Last Modified:03 Nov 2016 11:47
Publisher:Dansk Idraetsmedicinsk Selskab
ISSN:1397-4211
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/126748/

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