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Child Maltreatment and Migration: A Population-Based Study Among Immigrant and Native Adolescents in Switzerland


Schick, Matthis; Schönbucher, Verena; Landolt, Markus A; Schnyder, Ulrich; Xu, Wenjie; Maier, Thomas; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun (2016). Child Maltreatment and Migration: A Population-Based Study Among Immigrant and Native Adolescents in Switzerland. Child Maltreatment, 21(1):3-15.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Prevalence rates of child maltreatment (CM) can differ substantially between countries and ethnicities. Reasons, however, are complex and not sufficiently understood. METHOD This epidemiological study examined prevalence and risk factors of various types of CM in a population-based representative sample of native and immigrant adolescents in Switzerland (N = 6,787). RESULTS The prevalence of CM in general was lowest in the native group, higher in the Western immigrant group, and highest in the non-Western immigrant groups. An immigrant background was related to an overrepresentation of several risk factors for CM. Adjusted odds ratio of an immigrant background were still significant for physical and emotional abuse but not for neglect and sexual assault. CONCLUSIONS Differences in the prevalence of CM across ethnographic origins are at least partially related to socioeconomic and ecologic risk factors. The distribution of risk factors may vary depending on the contexts of migration.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Prevalence rates of child maltreatment (CM) can differ substantially between countries and ethnicities. Reasons, however, are complex and not sufficiently understood. METHOD This epidemiological study examined prevalence and risk factors of various types of CM in a population-based representative sample of native and immigrant adolescents in Switzerland (N = 6,787). RESULTS The prevalence of CM in general was lowest in the native group, higher in the Western immigrant group, and highest in the non-Western immigrant groups. An immigrant background was related to an overrepresentation of several risk factors for CM. Adjusted odds ratio of an immigrant background were still significant for physical and emotional abuse but not for neglect and sexual assault. CONCLUSIONS Differences in the prevalence of CM across ethnographic origins are at least partially related to socioeconomic and ecologic risk factors. The distribution of risk factors may vary depending on the contexts of migration.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Klinik für Konsiliarpsychiatrie und Psychosomatik
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:27 Nov 2015 12:07
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 15:09
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1077-5595
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1077559515617019
PubMed ID:26590238

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