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Clinicopathologic features of primary cutaneous melanoma: a single centre analysis of a Swiss regional population


Heppt, Markus V; Reinholz, Markus; Tietze, Julia K; Kerl, Katrin; French, Lars E; Berking, Carola; Kamarashev, Jivko (2015). Clinicopathologic features of primary cutaneous melanoma: a single centre analysis of a Swiss regional population. European Journal of Dermatology, 25(2):127-132.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Melanoma is a common type of skin cancer with poor survival in advanced stages. Screening efforts aim to detect and tackle tumors at an early stage. However, regional population-based data at the time of initial diagnosis are sparse.
OBJECTIVES: To analyse clinical and pathologic tumor characteristics in a Swiss population.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Melanoma samples diagnosed at a large Swiss academic department were evaluated for demographic, clinical and histopathologic data.
RESULTS: We analysed a total of 254 melanoma samples. In situ tumors were more common in females than in males (70.6% vs. 29.4%; p = 0.0032). The acro-lentiginous subtype was more common in in situ compared to invasive tumors (14.7% vs. 5.5%; p = 0.0011). Invasive tumors showed a preference for male gender in patients beyond 60 years of age (p = 0.0080). The most frequent anatomic sites were the trunk in males and the legs in females. Regression was more common in males than in females (35.2% vs. 11.7%; p = 0.0001). Breslow's thickness correlated significantly with age but not with gender. Ulceration was common in tumors thicker than 2.01 mm (48.4%; p = 0.0001). Regression was frequently detected in melanomas thinner than 1.00 mm (29.3%; p = 0.0263).
CONCLUSION: Screening efforts should target elderly patients. Skin examinations should include acral localisations and focus on the trunk in males and the lower extremities in females. Population-based analyses can help to fine-tune melanoma screening in defined regional populations.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Melanoma is a common type of skin cancer with poor survival in advanced stages. Screening efforts aim to detect and tackle tumors at an early stage. However, regional population-based data at the time of initial diagnosis are sparse.
OBJECTIVES: To analyse clinical and pathologic tumor characteristics in a Swiss population.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Melanoma samples diagnosed at a large Swiss academic department were evaluated for demographic, clinical and histopathologic data.
RESULTS: We analysed a total of 254 melanoma samples. In situ tumors were more common in females than in males (70.6% vs. 29.4%; p = 0.0032). The acro-lentiginous subtype was more common in in situ compared to invasive tumors (14.7% vs. 5.5%; p = 0.0011). Invasive tumors showed a preference for male gender in patients beyond 60 years of age (p = 0.0080). The most frequent anatomic sites were the trunk in males and the legs in females. Regression was more common in males than in females (35.2% vs. 11.7%; p = 0.0001). Breslow's thickness correlated significantly with age but not with gender. Ulceration was common in tumors thicker than 2.01 mm (48.4%; p = 0.0001). Regression was frequently detected in melanomas thinner than 1.00 mm (29.3%; p = 0.0263).
CONCLUSION: Screening efforts should target elderly patients. Skin examinations should include acral localisations and focus on the trunk in males and the lower extremities in females. Population-based analyses can help to fine-tune melanoma screening in defined regional populations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2015
Deposited On:09 Dec 2015 16:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:35
Publisher:John Libbey Eurotext
ISSN:1167-1122
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1684/ejd.2014.2500
PubMed ID:25787976

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