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A set of hypotheses on tribology of mammalian herbivore teeth


Kaiser, Thomas M; Clauss, Marcus; Schulz-Kornas, Ellen (2016). A set of hypotheses on tribology of mammalian herbivore teeth. Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, 4(1):014003.

Abstract

Once erupted, mammal cheek teeth molars are continuously worn. Contact of molar surfaces with ingesta and with other teeth contribute to this wear. Microscopic wear features (dental surface texture) change continuously as new wear overprints old texture features. These features have been debated to indicate diet. The general assumption in relating occlusal textures to diet is that they are independent of masticatory movements and forces. If this assumption is not accepted, one needs to propose that occlusal textures comprise signals not only from the ‘last supper’ but also from masticatory events that represent ecological, species- or taxon-specific adaptations, and that occlusal textures therefore give a rather unspecific, somehow diet-related signal that is functionally inadequately understood. In order to test for mechanical mechanisms of wear, we created a hypothesis matrix that related sampled individuals with six tribological variables. Three variables represent mechanically relevant ingesta properties, and three represent animal-specific characteristics of the masticatory system. Three groups of mammal species (free ranging Cetartiodactyla and Perissodactyla, free ranging primates, and artificially fed rabbits) were investigated in terms of their 3D dental surface textures, which were quantified employing ten ISO 25178 surface texture parameters.Wefirst formulated a set of specific predictions based on theoretical reflections on the effects of diet properties and animal characteristics, and subsequently performed discriminant analysis to test which parameters actually followed these predictions. We found that parameters Vvc, Vmc, Sp, Sq allowed the prediction of both, ingesta properties and properties of the masticatory system, if combined with other parameters. Sha, Sda and S5v had little predictive power in our dataset. Spd seemed rather unrelated to ingesta properties and made this parameter a suitable indicator of masticatory system properties.

Abstract

Once erupted, mammal cheek teeth molars are continuously worn. Contact of molar surfaces with ingesta and with other teeth contribute to this wear. Microscopic wear features (dental surface texture) change continuously as new wear overprints old texture features. These features have been debated to indicate diet. The general assumption in relating occlusal textures to diet is that they are independent of masticatory movements and forces. If this assumption is not accepted, one needs to propose that occlusal textures comprise signals not only from the ‘last supper’ but also from masticatory events that represent ecological, species- or taxon-specific adaptations, and that occlusal textures therefore give a rather unspecific, somehow diet-related signal that is functionally inadequately understood. In order to test for mechanical mechanisms of wear, we created a hypothesis matrix that related sampled individuals with six tribological variables. Three variables represent mechanically relevant ingesta properties, and three represent animal-specific characteristics of the masticatory system. Three groups of mammal species (free ranging Cetartiodactyla and Perissodactyla, free ranging primates, and artificially fed rabbits) were investigated in terms of their 3D dental surface textures, which were quantified employing ten ISO 25178 surface texture parameters.Wefirst formulated a set of specific predictions based on theoretical reflections on the effects of diet properties and animal characteristics, and subsequently performed discriminant analysis to test which parameters actually followed these predictions. We found that parameters Vvc, Vmc, Sp, Sq allowed the prediction of both, ingesta properties and properties of the masticatory system, if combined with other parameters. Sha, Sda and S5v had little predictive power in our dataset. Spd seemed rather unrelated to ingesta properties and made this parameter a suitable indicator of masticatory system properties.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:11 Dec 2015 13:15
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 10:49
Publisher:IOP Publishing
ISSN:2051-672X
Funders:DFG
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1088/2051-672X/4/1/014003

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