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Influence of bolus consistency and position on esophageal high-resolution manometry findings - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Bernhard, A; Pohl, D; Fried, M; Castell, D O; Tutuian, R (2008). Influence of bolus consistency and position on esophageal high-resolution manometry findings. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 53(5):1198-1205.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Conventional esophageal manometry evaluating liquid swallows in the recumbent position measures pressure changes at a limited number of sites and does not assess motility during solid swallows in the physiologic upright position.
AIM: To evaluate esophageal motility abnormalities during water and bread swallows in the upright and recumbent positions using high-resolution manometry (HRM).
METHODS: Thirty-two-channel HRM testing was performed using water (10 ml each) and bread swallows in the upright and recumbent positions. The swallows were considered normal if the distal peristaltic segment >30 mmHg was >5 cm, ineffective if the 30-mmHg pressure band was <5 cm, and simultaneous if the onset velocity of the 30 mmHg pressure band was >8 cm/s. Abnormal esophageal manometry was defined as the presence of > or =30% ineffective and/or > or =20% simultaneous contractions.
RESULTS: The data from 96 patients (48 F; mean age 51 years, range 17-79) evaluated for dysphagia (56%), chest pain (22%), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms (22%) were reviewed. During recumbent water swallows, patients with dysphagia, chest pain, and GERD had a similar prevalence of motility abnormalities. During upright bread swallows, motility abnormalities were more frequent (p = 0.01) in patients with chest pain (71%) and GERD (67%) compared to patients with dysphagia (37%).
CONCLUSIONS: Evaluating bread swallows in the upright position reveals differences in motility abnormalities overlooked by liquid swallows alone.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Conventional esophageal manometry evaluating liquid swallows in the recumbent position measures pressure changes at a limited number of sites and does not assess motility during solid swallows in the physiologic upright position.
AIM: To evaluate esophageal motility abnormalities during water and bread swallows in the upright and recumbent positions using high-resolution manometry (HRM).
METHODS: Thirty-two-channel HRM testing was performed using water (10 ml each) and bread swallows in the upright and recumbent positions. The swallows were considered normal if the distal peristaltic segment >30 mmHg was >5 cm, ineffective if the 30-mmHg pressure band was <5 cm, and simultaneous if the onset velocity of the 30 mmHg pressure band was >8 cm/s. Abnormal esophageal manometry was defined as the presence of > or =30% ineffective and/or > or =20% simultaneous contractions.
RESULTS: The data from 96 patients (48 F; mean age 51 years, range 17-79) evaluated for dysphagia (56%), chest pain (22%), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms (22%) were reviewed. During recumbent water swallows, patients with dysphagia, chest pain, and GERD had a similar prevalence of motility abnormalities. During upright bread swallows, motility abnormalities were more frequent (p = 0.01) in patients with chest pain (71%) and GERD (67%) compared to patients with dysphagia (37%).
CONCLUSIONS: Evaluating bread swallows in the upright position reveals differences in motility abnormalities overlooked by liquid swallows alone.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2008
Deposited On:27 Jan 2009 10:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0163-2116
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-007-0014-z
PubMed ID:17932767

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