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Wnt/BMP signal integration regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells in the dorsal spinal cord - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Ille, Fabian; Atanasoski, Suzana; Falk, Sven; Ittner, Lars M; Märki, David; Büchmann-Møller, Stine; Wurdak, Heiko; Suter, Ueli; Taketo, Makoto M; Sommer, Lukas (2007). Wnt/BMP signal integration regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells in the dorsal spinal cord. Developmental Biology, 304(1):394-408.

Abstract

Multiple signaling pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells during early development of the central nervous system (CNS). In the spinal cord, dorsal signaling by bone morphogenic protein (BMP) acts primarily as a patterning signal, while canonical Wnt signaling promotes cell cycle progression in stem and progenitor cells. However, overexpression of Wnt factors or, as shown here, stabilization of the Wnt signaling component beta-catenin has a more prominent effect in the ventral than in the dorsal spinal cord, revealing local differences in signal interpretation. Intriguingly, Wnt signaling is associated with BMP signal activation in the dorsal spinal cord. This points to a spatially restricted interaction between these pathways. Indeed, BMP counteracts proliferation promoted by Wnt in spinal cord neuroepithelial cells. Conversely, Wnt antagonizes BMP-dependent neuronal differentiation. Thus, a mutually inhibitory crosstalk between Wnt and BMP signaling controls the balance between proliferation and differentiation. A model emerges in which dorsal Wnt/BMP signal integration links growth and patterning, thereby maintaining undifferentiated and slow-cycling neural progenitors that form the dorsal confines of the developing spinal cord.

Abstract

Multiple signaling pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells during early development of the central nervous system (CNS). In the spinal cord, dorsal signaling by bone morphogenic protein (BMP) acts primarily as a patterning signal, while canonical Wnt signaling promotes cell cycle progression in stem and progenitor cells. However, overexpression of Wnt factors or, as shown here, stabilization of the Wnt signaling component beta-catenin has a more prominent effect in the ventral than in the dorsal spinal cord, revealing local differences in signal interpretation. Intriguingly, Wnt signaling is associated with BMP signal activation in the dorsal spinal cord. This points to a spatially restricted interaction between these pathways. Indeed, BMP counteracts proliferation promoted by Wnt in spinal cord neuroepithelial cells. Conversely, Wnt antagonizes BMP-dependent neuronal differentiation. Thus, a mutually inhibitory crosstalk between Wnt and BMP signaling controls the balance between proliferation and differentiation. A model emerges in which dorsal Wnt/BMP signal integration links growth and patterning, thereby maintaining undifferentiated and slow-cycling neural progenitors that form the dorsal confines of the developing spinal cord.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2007
Deposited On:08 Dec 2015 14:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0012-1606
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2006.12.045
PubMed ID:17292876

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