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Evolution of quantitative traits under a migration-selection balance: when does skew matter?


Débarre, Florence; Yeaman, Sam; Guillaume, Frédéric (2015). Evolution of quantitative traits under a migration-selection balance: when does skew matter? The American Naturalist, 186:S37-S47.

Abstract

Quantitative-genetic models of differentiation under migration-selection balance often rely on the assumption of normally distributed genotypic and phenotypic values. When a population is subdivided into demes with selection toward different local optima, migration between demes may result in asymmetric, or skewed, local distributions. Using a simplified two-habitat model, we derive formulas without a priori assuming a Gaussian distribution of genotypic values, and we find expressions that naturally incorporate higher moments, such as skew. These formulas yield predictions of the expected divergence under migration-selection balance that are more accurate than models assuming Gaussian distributions, which illustrates the importance of incorporating these higher moments to assess the response to selection in heterogeneous environments. We further show with simulations that traits with loci of large effect display the largest skew in their distribution at migration-selection balance.

Abstract

Quantitative-genetic models of differentiation under migration-selection balance often rely on the assumption of normally distributed genotypic and phenotypic values. When a population is subdivided into demes with selection toward different local optima, migration between demes may result in asymmetric, or skewed, local distributions. Using a simplified two-habitat model, we derive formulas without a priori assuming a Gaussian distribution of genotypic values, and we find expressions that naturally incorporate higher moments, such as skew. These formulas yield predictions of the expected divergence under migration-selection balance that are more accurate than models assuming Gaussian distributions, which illustrates the importance of incorporating these higher moments to assess the response to selection in heterogeneous environments. We further show with simulations that traits with loci of large effect display the largest skew in their distribution at migration-selection balance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:16 Dec 2015 10:10
Last Modified:01 Oct 2016 00:01
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0003-0147
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Collaborative Research and Training Experience [CREATE] Program in Biodiversity Research, Canada, AdapTree, Genome British Columbia
Additional Information:© 2015 by The University of Chicago
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/681717
Official URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/info/10.1086/681717

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