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Evolution of selfing: recurrent patterns in molecular adaptation


Shimizu, Kentaro K; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi (2015). Evolution of selfing: recurrent patterns in molecular adaptation. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 46:593-622.

Abstract

Selfing has evolved in animals, fungi, and plants, and since Darwin’s pioneer- ing study, it is considered one of the most frequent evolutionary trends in flowering plants. Generally, the evolution of selfing is characterized by a loss of self-incompatibility, the selfing syndrome, and changes in genome-wide polymorphism patterns. Recent interdisciplinary studies involving molecu- lar functional experiments, genome-wide data, experimental evolution, and evolutionary ecology using Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, and other species show that the evolution of selfing is not merely a degradation of outcrossing traits but a model for studying the recurrent patterns underlying adaptive molecular evolution. For example, in wild Arabidopsis relatives, self- compatibility evolved from mutations in the male specificity gene, S-LOCUS CYSTEINE-RICH PROTEIN/S-LOCUS PROTEIN 11 (SCR/SP11), rather than the female specificity gene, S-LOCUS RECEPTOR KINASE (SRK), sup- porting the theoretical prediction of sexual asymmetry. Prevalence of domi- nant self-compatible mutations is consistent with Haldane’s sieve, which acts against recessive adaptive mutations. Time estimates based on genome-wide polymorphisms and self-incompatibility genes generally support the recent origin of selfing.

Abstract

Selfing has evolved in animals, fungi, and plants, and since Darwin’s pioneer- ing study, it is considered one of the most frequent evolutionary trends in flowering plants. Generally, the evolution of selfing is characterized by a loss of self-incompatibility, the selfing syndrome, and changes in genome-wide polymorphism patterns. Recent interdisciplinary studies involving molecu- lar functional experiments, genome-wide data, experimental evolution, and evolutionary ecology using Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, and other species show that the evolution of selfing is not merely a degradation of outcrossing traits but a model for studying the recurrent patterns underlying adaptive molecular evolution. For example, in wild Arabidopsis relatives, self- compatibility evolved from mutations in the male specificity gene, S-LOCUS CYSTEINE-RICH PROTEIN/S-LOCUS PROTEIN 11 (SCR/SP11), rather than the female specificity gene, S-LOCUS RECEPTOR KINASE (SRK), sup- porting the theoretical prediction of sexual asymmetry. Prevalence of domi- nant self-compatible mutations is consistent with Haldane’s sieve, which acts against recessive adaptive mutations. Time estimates based on genome-wide polymorphisms and self-incompatibility genes generally support the recent origin of selfing.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
08 University Research Priority Programs > Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:December 2015
Deposited On:11 Dec 2015 10:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:38
Publisher:Annual Reviews
ISSN:1545-2069
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249
Official URL:http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249
Related URLs:http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/eprint/SjP8kaSPpXgCyQ6u4FEF/full/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249 (Publisher)

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