Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transparency of assessment centers: lower criterion-related validity but greater opportunity to perform?


Ingold, Pia Verena; Kleinmann, Martin; König, Cornelius J; Melchers, Klaus G (2016). Transparency of assessment centers: lower criterion-related validity but greater opportunity to perform? Personnel Psychology, 69(2):467-497.

Abstract

Assessment centers (ACs) are popular selection devices in which assessees are assessed on several dimensions during different exercises. Surveys indicate that ACs vary with regard to the transparency of the targeted dimensions and that the number of transparent ACs has increased during recent years. Furthermore, research on this design feature has put conceptual arguments forward regarding the effects of transparency on criterion-related validity, impression management, and fairness perceptions. This study is the first to examine these effects using supervisor-rated job performance data as the criterion. We conducted simulated ACs with transparency as a between-subjects factor. The sample consisted of part-time employed participants who would soon be applying for a new job. In line with our hypothesis, results showed that ratings from an AC with nontransparent dimensions were more criterion valid than ratings from an AC with transparent dimensions. Concerning impression management, our results supported the hypothesis that transparency moderates the relationship between self-promotion and job performance, such that self-promotion in the nontransparent AC was more positively related to job performance than self-promotion in the transparent AC. The data lent no support for the hypothesis that participants’ perceptions of their opportunity to perform are higher in the transparent AC.

Abstract

Assessment centers (ACs) are popular selection devices in which assessees are assessed on several dimensions during different exercises. Surveys indicate that ACs vary with regard to the transparency of the targeted dimensions and that the number of transparent ACs has increased during recent years. Furthermore, research on this design feature has put conceptual arguments forward regarding the effects of transparency on criterion-related validity, impression management, and fairness perceptions. This study is the first to examine these effects using supervisor-rated job performance data as the criterion. We conducted simulated ACs with transparency as a between-subjects factor. The sample consisted of part-time employed participants who would soon be applying for a new job. In line with our hypothesis, results showed that ratings from an AC with nontransparent dimensions were more criterion valid than ratings from an AC with transparent dimensions. Concerning impression management, our results supported the hypothesis that transparency moderates the relationship between self-promotion and job performance, such that self-promotion in the nontransparent AC was more positively related to job performance than self-promotion in the transparent AC. The data lent no support for the hypothesis that participants’ perceptions of their opportunity to perform are higher in the transparent AC.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:15 Dec 2015 11:18
Last Modified:14 Apr 2016 01:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0031-5826
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/peps.12105

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations