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Epidural analgesia and perioperative kidney function after major liver resection


Kambakamba, P; Slankamenac, K; Tschuor, C; Kron, P; Wirsching, A; Maurer, K; Petrowsky, H; Clavien, P A; Lesurtel, M (2015). Epidural analgesia and perioperative kidney function after major liver resection. The British Journal of Surgery, 102(7):805-812.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epidural analgesia (EDA) is a common analgesia regimen in liver resection, and is accompanied by sympathicolysis, peripheral vasodilatation and hypotension in the context of deliberate intraoperative low central venous pressure. This associated fall in mean arterial pressure may compromise renal blood pressure autoregulation and lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). This study investigated whether EDA is a risk factor for postoperative AKI after liver surgery.
METHODS: The incidence of AKI was investigated retrospectively in patients who underwent liver resection with or without EDA between 2002 and 2012. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed including recognized preoperative and intraoperative predictors of posthepatectomy renal failure.
RESULTS: A series of 1153 patients was investigated. AKI occurred in 8·2 per cent of patients and was associated with increased morbidity (71 versus 47·3 per cent; P = 0·003) and mortality (21 versus 0·3 per cent; P <  0·001) rates. The incidence of AKI was significantly higher in the EDA group (10·1 versus 3·7 per cent; P = 0·003). Although there was no significant difference in the incidence of AKI between patients undergoing minor hepatectomy with or without EDA (5·2 versus 2·7 per cent; P = 0·421), a substantial difference in AKI rates occurred in patients undergoing major hepatectomy (13·8 versus 5·0 per cent; P = 0·025). In multivariable analysis, EDA remained an independent risk factor for AKI after hepatectomy (P = 0·040).
CONCLUSION: EDA may be a risk factor for postoperative AKI after major hepatectomy

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epidural analgesia (EDA) is a common analgesia regimen in liver resection, and is accompanied by sympathicolysis, peripheral vasodilatation and hypotension in the context of deliberate intraoperative low central venous pressure. This associated fall in mean arterial pressure may compromise renal blood pressure autoregulation and lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). This study investigated whether EDA is a risk factor for postoperative AKI after liver surgery.
METHODS: The incidence of AKI was investigated retrospectively in patients who underwent liver resection with or without EDA between 2002 and 2012. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed including recognized preoperative and intraoperative predictors of posthepatectomy renal failure.
RESULTS: A series of 1153 patients was investigated. AKI occurred in 8·2 per cent of patients and was associated with increased morbidity (71 versus 47·3 per cent; P = 0·003) and mortality (21 versus 0·3 per cent; P <  0·001) rates. The incidence of AKI was significantly higher in the EDA group (10·1 versus 3·7 per cent; P = 0·003). Although there was no significant difference in the incidence of AKI between patients undergoing minor hepatectomy with or without EDA (5·2 versus 2·7 per cent; P = 0·421), a substantial difference in AKI rates occurred in patients undergoing major hepatectomy (13·8 versus 5·0 per cent; P = 0·025). In multivariable analysis, EDA remained an independent risk factor for AKI after hepatectomy (P = 0·040).
CONCLUSION: EDA may be a risk factor for postoperative AKI after major hepatectomy

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:14 Dec 2015 11:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0007-1323
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/bjs.9810
PubMed ID:25877255

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