Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Decelerated vascularization in tissue-engineered constructs in association with diabetes mellitus in vivo


Schumann, Paul; Lindhorst, Daniel; Kampmann, Andreas; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Krone-Wolf, Sonja; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; von See, Constantin; Gander, Thomas; Lanzer, Martin; Rücker, Martin; Essig, Harald (2015). Decelerated vascularization in tissue-engineered constructs in association with diabetes mellitus in vivo. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 29(7):855-864.

Abstract

AIMS: Rapid blood vessel ingrowth in transplanted tissue engineering constructs is the key factor for successful incorporation, but many potential patients who may use engineered tissues suffer from widespread diseases that limit the capacity of neovascularization (e.g. diabetes). Thus, in vivo vascularization analyses of tissue-engineered constructs in angiogenically affected organisms are required.
METHODS: We therefore investigated the in vivo incorporation of collagen-coated and cell-seeded poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds in diabetic B6.BKS(D)-Lepr(db)/J mice using repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy over a time period of two weeks. For this purpose, scaffolds were seeded with osteoblast-like or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and implanted into the dorsal skinfold chambers of diabetic and non-diabetic (C57BL/6) mice.
RESULTS: Apart from slightly increased inflammatory parameters, diabetic mice showed significantly reduced capillary densities compared with non-diabetic animals from day 6 onward. In line with previous studies, more densely meshed microvascular networks were demonstrated in cell-seeded than in collagen-coated scaffolds from day 6 onward within the single groups (diabetic and control).
CONCLUSIONS: A large number of patients who suffer from systemic diseases that affect angiogenesis would profit from tissue engineering. Therefore, the challenge for the clinical introduction of tissue-engineered constructs will be to overcome the decreased angiogenesis in diabetic organisms.

Abstract

AIMS: Rapid blood vessel ingrowth in transplanted tissue engineering constructs is the key factor for successful incorporation, but many potential patients who may use engineered tissues suffer from widespread diseases that limit the capacity of neovascularization (e.g. diabetes). Thus, in vivo vascularization analyses of tissue-engineered constructs in angiogenically affected organisms are required.
METHODS: We therefore investigated the in vivo incorporation of collagen-coated and cell-seeded poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds in diabetic B6.BKS(D)-Lepr(db)/J mice using repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy over a time period of two weeks. For this purpose, scaffolds were seeded with osteoblast-like or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and implanted into the dorsal skinfold chambers of diabetic and non-diabetic (C57BL/6) mice.
RESULTS: Apart from slightly increased inflammatory parameters, diabetic mice showed significantly reduced capillary densities compared with non-diabetic animals from day 6 onward. In line with previous studies, more densely meshed microvascular networks were demonstrated in cell-seeded than in collagen-coated scaffolds from day 6 onward within the single groups (diabetic and control).
CONCLUSIONS: A large number of patients who suffer from systemic diseases that affect angiogenesis would profit from tissue engineering. Therefore, the challenge for the clinical introduction of tissue-engineered constructs will be to overcome the decreased angiogenesis in diabetic organisms.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

11 downloads since deposited on 15 Dec 2015
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Angiogenesis; B6.BKS(D)-Leprdb/J mouse; Intravital fluorescence microscopy; PLGA scaffold; Tissue engineering
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:15 Dec 2015 10:54
Last Modified:01 Nov 2016 01:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1056-8727
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2015.06.004
PubMed ID:26195138

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 161kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations