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Lifestyle and health-related predictors of cervical cancer screening attendance in a Swiss population-based study


Richard, Aline; Rohrmann, Sabine; Schmid, Seraina M; Tirri, Brigitte Frey; Huang, Dorothy J; Güth, Uwe; Eichholzer, Monika (2015). Lifestyle and health-related predictors of cervical cancer screening attendance in a Swiss population-based study. Cancer Epidemiology, 39(6):870-876.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Since the implementation of cervical cancer (CC) screening, incidence and mortality rates have decreased worldwide. Little is known about lifestyle and health-related predictors of cervical cancer screening attendance in Switzerland. Our aim was to examine the relationship between lifestyle and health-related factors and the attendance to CC screening in Switzerland.
METHODS: We analyzed data of 20-69 years old women (n=7319) of the Swiss Health Survey (SHS) 2012. Lifestyle factors included body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity and attention to diet. Health-related factors of interest were diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol levels, chronic diseases, self-perceived health, and psychological distress. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses with the dichotomized CC screening status as outcome measure and adjusted for demographic factors.
RESULTS: Obesity, low physical activity, and not paying attention to diet were statistically significantly associated with lower CC screening participation. High cholesterol levels and history of chronic diseases were statistically significantly positively associated with screening participation.
CONCLUSION: Being obese, physically inactive and non-attention to diet are risk factors for CC screening attendance. These findings are of importance for improving the CC screening practices of low-user groups.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Since the implementation of cervical cancer (CC) screening, incidence and mortality rates have decreased worldwide. Little is known about lifestyle and health-related predictors of cervical cancer screening attendance in Switzerland. Our aim was to examine the relationship between lifestyle and health-related factors and the attendance to CC screening in Switzerland.
METHODS: We analyzed data of 20-69 years old women (n=7319) of the Swiss Health Survey (SHS) 2012. Lifestyle factors included body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity and attention to diet. Health-related factors of interest were diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol levels, chronic diseases, self-perceived health, and psychological distress. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses with the dichotomized CC screening status as outcome measure and adjusted for demographic factors.
RESULTS: Obesity, low physical activity, and not paying attention to diet were statistically significantly associated with lower CC screening participation. High cholesterol levels and history of chronic diseases were statistically significantly positively associated with screening participation.
CONCLUSION: Being obese, physically inactive and non-attention to diet are risk factors for CC screening attendance. These findings are of importance for improving the CC screening practices of low-user groups.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:22 Dec 2015 08:02
Last Modified:01 Jan 2017 01:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1877-7821
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2015.09.009
PubMed ID:26651449

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