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MRI-determined total volumes of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal and trunk adipose tissue are differentially and sex-dependently associated with patterns of estimated usual nutrient intake in a northern German population


Fischer, Karina; Moewes, Daniela; Koch, Manja; Müller, Hans-Peter; Jacobs, Gunnar; Kassubek, Jan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Nöthlings, Ute (2015). MRI-determined total volumes of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal and trunk adipose tissue are differentially and sex-dependently associated with patterns of estimated usual nutrient intake in a northern German population. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(4):794-807.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAAT) and trunk (STRAT) adipose tissue (AT) have been suggested to be differentially influenced by diet. OBJECTIVE We investigated whether and to what extent usual patterns of nutrient intake are associated with VAT, SAAT, and STRAT compared with nondietary predictors in northern German adults (n = 583). DESIGN AT volumes were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging. Nutrient intake was estimated by a 112-item food-frequency questionnaire linked to the German Food Code and Nutrient Database. Exploratory nutrient patterns were derived by principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares regression (PLS) of 87 nutrients. Cross-sectional associations between nutrient patterns, single nutrients, or total energy intake and AT compartments were analyzed by multiple linear regression. RESULTS Next to sex and age, respectively, which were important nondietary predictors and accounted for more of the variation in VAT (∼13% and ∼4%) than in SAAT or STRAT (both 4-7% and <1%), variation in VAT (16.8% or 17.6%) was explained to a greater extent by 9 or 2 nutrient patterns derived by principal components analysis or partial least-squares regression, respectively, than was variation in SAAT (10.6% or 8.2%) or STRAT (11.5% or 8.6%). Whereas VAT (16.6%) was primarily explained by nutrient quality, SAAT (6.9%) and STRAT (7.4%) were mainly explained by total energy intake. VAT was positively associated with nutrients characteristic of animal (except for dairy) products, including arachidonic acid (standardized β: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.34; P < 0.0001), but negatively with dietary fiber, including polypentoses (standardized β: -0.17; 95% CI: -0.24, -0.09; P < 0.0001), and nutrients found in milk. The direction and strength of many associations, however, depended strongly on sex and adjustment for BMI. CONCLUSION VAT may be particularly associated with sex-specific interplays of nutrients found in animal products and fiber, whereas SAAT and STRAT are associated with total energy intake.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAAT) and trunk (STRAT) adipose tissue (AT) have been suggested to be differentially influenced by diet. OBJECTIVE We investigated whether and to what extent usual patterns of nutrient intake are associated with VAT, SAAT, and STRAT compared with nondietary predictors in northern German adults (n = 583). DESIGN AT volumes were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging. Nutrient intake was estimated by a 112-item food-frequency questionnaire linked to the German Food Code and Nutrient Database. Exploratory nutrient patterns were derived by principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares regression (PLS) of 87 nutrients. Cross-sectional associations between nutrient patterns, single nutrients, or total energy intake and AT compartments were analyzed by multiple linear regression. RESULTS Next to sex and age, respectively, which were important nondietary predictors and accounted for more of the variation in VAT (∼13% and ∼4%) than in SAAT or STRAT (both 4-7% and <1%), variation in VAT (16.8% or 17.6%) was explained to a greater extent by 9 or 2 nutrient patterns derived by principal components analysis or partial least-squares regression, respectively, than was variation in SAAT (10.6% or 8.2%) or STRAT (11.5% or 8.6%). Whereas VAT (16.6%) was primarily explained by nutrient quality, SAAT (6.9%) and STRAT (7.4%) were mainly explained by total energy intake. VAT was positively associated with nutrients characteristic of animal (except for dairy) products, including arachidonic acid (standardized β: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.34; P < 0.0001), but negatively with dietary fiber, including polypentoses (standardized β: -0.17; 95% CI: -0.24, -0.09; P < 0.0001), and nutrients found in milk. The direction and strength of many associations, however, depended strongly on sex and adjustment for BMI. CONCLUSION VAT may be particularly associated with sex-specific interplays of nutrients found in animal products and fiber, whereas SAAT and STRAT are associated with total energy intake.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:April 2015
Deposited On:12 Jan 2016 09:07
Last Modified:06 Jan 2017 09:51
Publisher:American Society for Nutrition
ISSN:0002-9165
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.101626
PubMed ID:25833977

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