Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Hepatic glycogen storage disorders: what have we learned in recent years?


Burda, Patricie; Hochuli, Michel (2015). Hepatic glycogen storage disorders: what have we learned in recent years? Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 18(4):415-421.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Glycogen storage disorders (GSDs) are inborn errors of metabolism with abnormal storage or utilization of glycogen. The present review focuses on recent advances in hepatic GSD types I, III and VI/IX, with emphasis on clinical aspects and treatment. RECENT FINDINGS Evidence accumulates that poor metabolic control is a risk factor for the development of long-term complications, such as liver adenomas, low bone density/osteoporosis, and kidney disease in GSD I. However, mechanisms leading to these complications remain poorly understood and are being investigated. Molecular causes underlying neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction in GSD I have been elucidated. Case series provide new insights into the natural course and outcome of GSD types VI and IX. For GSD III, a high protein/fat diet has been reported to improve (cardio)myopathy, but the beneficial effect of this dietary concept on muscle and liver disease manifestations needs to be further established in prospective studies. SUMMARY Although further knowledge has been gained regarding pathophysiology, disease course, treatment, and complications of hepatic GSDs, more controlled prospective studies are needed to assess effects of different dietary and medical treatment options on long-term outcome and quality of life.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Glycogen storage disorders (GSDs) are inborn errors of metabolism with abnormal storage or utilization of glycogen. The present review focuses on recent advances in hepatic GSD types I, III and VI/IX, with emphasis on clinical aspects and treatment. RECENT FINDINGS Evidence accumulates that poor metabolic control is a risk factor for the development of long-term complications, such as liver adenomas, low bone density/osteoporosis, and kidney disease in GSD I. However, mechanisms leading to these complications remain poorly understood and are being investigated. Molecular causes underlying neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction in GSD I have been elucidated. Case series provide new insights into the natural course and outcome of GSD types VI and IX. For GSD III, a high protein/fat diet has been reported to improve (cardio)myopathy, but the beneficial effect of this dietary concept on muscle and liver disease manifestations needs to be further established in prospective studies. SUMMARY Although further knowledge has been gained regarding pathophysiology, disease course, treatment, and complications of hepatic GSDs, more controlled prospective studies are needed to assess effects of different dietary and medical treatment options on long-term outcome and quality of life.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

133 downloads since deposited on 28 Dec 2015
124 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:28 Dec 2015 13:48
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 16:24
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1363-1950
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000181
PubMed ID:26001652

Download

Download PDF  'Hepatic glycogen storage disorders: what have we learned in recent years?'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 277kB
View at publisher