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Gender disparities in acute coronary syndrome: a closing gap in the short-term outcome


Ghadri, Jelena R; Sarcon, Annahita; Jaguszewski, Milosz; Diekmann, Johanna; Bataiosu, Roxana D; Hellermann, Jens; Csordas, Adam; Baumann, Lukas; Schöni, Aline A; Lüscher, Thomas F; Templin, Christian (2015). Gender disparities in acute coronary syndrome: a closing gap in the short-term outcome. Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine, 16(5):355-362.

Abstract

AIMS The aim of the present study was to analyze gender disparities in a large cohort of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients from the Zurich Acute Coronary Syndrome (Z-ACS) Registry. METHODS Gender disparities in ACS were examined. The primary endpoint included in-hospital death rate, and the secondary endpoint major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) at 30-day follow-up. Furthermore, independent predictors for MACCEs and death were identified. RESULTS In total, 2612 patients with ACS were identified. Out of these, 23% were women. The mean age was higher in women (68.6 ± 12.2; P < 0.001). Troponin-T on admission (1.33 ± 4.64 vs. 1.19 ± 3.04 μg/l; P = 0.002) and N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide on admission (3456.2 ± 7286.7 vs. 1665.6 ± 4800.6 ng/l; P < 0.001) were higher in women compared with men. Single-vessel disease was more common in women (44.9 vs. 39.7%; P = 0.023) and, conversely, multivessel disease was more prevalent in male patients as compared with their female counterparts (59.4 vs. 54.4%; P = 0.029). At discharge, men were more likely prescribed statins (89.4 vs. 85.2%; P = 0.004). Overall mortality and MACCEs were similar for both genders. In women, peak creatine kinase and peak C-reactive protein emerged as independent predictors for MACCEs and SBP on admission, and maximal C-reactive protein and use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIIb/IIIa) as strong independent predictors for in-hospital death. CONCLUSION The present results suggest a closing gap in short-term outcome and improvement in cardiac care between women and men. Nonetheless, differences in treatment strategies continue to exist, particularly pertaining to statin regimens at discharge, which might potentially have a powerful impact on long-term outcomes and gender disparities.

Abstract

AIMS The aim of the present study was to analyze gender disparities in a large cohort of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients from the Zurich Acute Coronary Syndrome (Z-ACS) Registry. METHODS Gender disparities in ACS were examined. The primary endpoint included in-hospital death rate, and the secondary endpoint major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) at 30-day follow-up. Furthermore, independent predictors for MACCEs and death were identified. RESULTS In total, 2612 patients with ACS were identified. Out of these, 23% were women. The mean age was higher in women (68.6 ± 12.2; P < 0.001). Troponin-T on admission (1.33 ± 4.64 vs. 1.19 ± 3.04 μg/l; P = 0.002) and N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide on admission (3456.2 ± 7286.7 vs. 1665.6 ± 4800.6 ng/l; P < 0.001) were higher in women compared with men. Single-vessel disease was more common in women (44.9 vs. 39.7%; P = 0.023) and, conversely, multivessel disease was more prevalent in male patients as compared with their female counterparts (59.4 vs. 54.4%; P = 0.029). At discharge, men were more likely prescribed statins (89.4 vs. 85.2%; P = 0.004). Overall mortality and MACCEs were similar for both genders. In women, peak creatine kinase and peak C-reactive protein emerged as independent predictors for MACCEs and SBP on admission, and maximal C-reactive protein and use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIIb/IIIa) as strong independent predictors for in-hospital death. CONCLUSION The present results suggest a closing gap in short-term outcome and improvement in cardiac care between women and men. Nonetheless, differences in treatment strategies continue to exist, particularly pertaining to statin regimens at discharge, which might potentially have a powerful impact on long-term outcomes and gender disparities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2015
Deposited On:13 Jan 2016 15:34
Last Modified:01 Jun 2016 00:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1558-2027
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2459/JCM.0000000000000248
PubMed ID:25826477

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