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Reasons for discontinuation of recommended therapies according to the patients after acute coronary syndromes


Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Nanchen, David; Carballo, David; Vogt, Pierre; Carballo, Sebastian; Meyer, Philippe; Matter, Christian M; Windecker, Stephan; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Mach, François (2015). Reasons for discontinuation of recommended therapies according to the patients after acute coronary syndromes. European Journal of Internal Medicine, 26(1):56-62.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The prescription of recommended medical therapies is a key factor to improve prognosis after acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, reasons for cardiovascular therapies discontinuation after hospital discharge are poorly reported in previous studies. METHODS We enrolled 3055 consecutive patients hospitalized with a main diagnosis of ACS in four Swiss university hospitals with a prospective one-year follow-up. We assessed the self-reported use of recommended therapies and the reasons for medication discontinuation according to the patient interview performed at one-year follow-up. RESULTS 3014 (99.3%) patients were discharged with aspirin, 2983 (98.4%) with statin, 2464 (81.2%) with beta-blocker, 2738 (90.3%) with ACE inhibitors/ARB and 2597 (100%) with P2Y12 inhibitors if treated with coronary stent. At the one-year follow-up, the discontinuation percentages were 2.9% for aspirin, 6.6% for statin, 11.6% for beta-blocker, 15.1% for ACE inhibitor/ARB and 17.8% for P2Y12 inhibitors. Most patients reported having discontinued their medication based on their physicians' decision: 64 (2.1%) for aspirin, 82 (2.7%) for statin, 212 (8.6%) for beta-blocker, 251 (9.1% for ACE inhibitor/ARB) and 293 (11.4%) for P2Y12 inhibitors, while side effect, perception that medication was unnecessary and medication costs were uncommon reported reasons (<2%) according to the patients. CONCLUSIONS Discontinuation of recommended therapies after ACS differs according the class of medication with the lowest percentages for aspirin. According to patients, most stopped their cardiovascular medication based on their physician's decision, while spontaneous discontinuation was infrequent.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The prescription of recommended medical therapies is a key factor to improve prognosis after acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, reasons for cardiovascular therapies discontinuation after hospital discharge are poorly reported in previous studies. METHODS We enrolled 3055 consecutive patients hospitalized with a main diagnosis of ACS in four Swiss university hospitals with a prospective one-year follow-up. We assessed the self-reported use of recommended therapies and the reasons for medication discontinuation according to the patient interview performed at one-year follow-up. RESULTS 3014 (99.3%) patients were discharged with aspirin, 2983 (98.4%) with statin, 2464 (81.2%) with beta-blocker, 2738 (90.3%) with ACE inhibitors/ARB and 2597 (100%) with P2Y12 inhibitors if treated with coronary stent. At the one-year follow-up, the discontinuation percentages were 2.9% for aspirin, 6.6% for statin, 11.6% for beta-blocker, 15.1% for ACE inhibitor/ARB and 17.8% for P2Y12 inhibitors. Most patients reported having discontinued their medication based on their physicians' decision: 64 (2.1%) for aspirin, 82 (2.7%) for statin, 212 (8.6%) for beta-blocker, 251 (9.1% for ACE inhibitor/ARB) and 293 (11.4%) for P2Y12 inhibitors, while side effect, perception that medication was unnecessary and medication costs were uncommon reported reasons (<2%) according to the patients. CONCLUSIONS Discontinuation of recommended therapies after ACS differs according the class of medication with the lowest percentages for aspirin. According to patients, most stopped their cardiovascular medication based on their physician's decision, while spontaneous discontinuation was infrequent.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2015
Deposited On:14 Jan 2016 08:49
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 10:27
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0953-6205
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2014.12.014
PubMed ID:25582072

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