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The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations


Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat (2016). The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 170(1):103-115.

Abstract

The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Abstract

The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:12 Jan 2016 09:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:52
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1552-4825
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.37383
PubMed ID:26373698

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