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Characterization of 28 novel patients expands the mutational and phenotypic spectrum of Lowe syndrome


Recker, Florian; Zaniew, Marcin; Böckenhauer, Detlef; et al (2015). Characterization of 28 novel patients expands the mutational and phenotypic spectrum of Lowe syndrome. Pediatric Nephrology, 30(6):931-943.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is a rare X-linked multi-systemic disorder, almost always characterized by the triad of congenital cataract, cognitive and behavioral impairment and a proximal tubulopathy. METHODS Twenty-eight novel patients with suspected Lowe syndrome were studied. RESULTS All patients carried OCRL gene defects with mutational hot spots at CpG dinucleotides. Mutations previously unknown in Lowe syndrome were observed in ten of the 28 patients, and carriership was identified in 30.4 % of the mothers investigated. Mapping the exact breakpoints of a complete OCRL gene deletion revealed involvement of several flanking repeat elements. We noted a similar pattern of documented clinically relevant symptoms, and even though the patient cohort comprised relatively young patients, 32 % of these patients already showed advanced chronic kidney disease. Thrombocytopenia was seen in several patients, and hyperosmia and/or hyperacusis were reported recurrently. A p.Asp523Asn mutation in a Polish patient, associated with the typical cerebrorenal spectrum but with late cataract (10 year), was also evident in two milder affected Italian brothers with ocular involvement of similar progression. CONCLUSIONS We have identified clinical features in 28 patients with suspected Lowe syndrome that had not been recognized in Lowe syndrome prior to our study. We also provide further evidence that OCRL mutations cause a phenotypic continuum with selective and/or time-dependent organ involvement. At least some of these mutants might exhibit a genotype-phenotype correlation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is a rare X-linked multi-systemic disorder, almost always characterized by the triad of congenital cataract, cognitive and behavioral impairment and a proximal tubulopathy. METHODS Twenty-eight novel patients with suspected Lowe syndrome were studied. RESULTS All patients carried OCRL gene defects with mutational hot spots at CpG dinucleotides. Mutations previously unknown in Lowe syndrome were observed in ten of the 28 patients, and carriership was identified in 30.4 % of the mothers investigated. Mapping the exact breakpoints of a complete OCRL gene deletion revealed involvement of several flanking repeat elements. We noted a similar pattern of documented clinically relevant symptoms, and even though the patient cohort comprised relatively young patients, 32 % of these patients already showed advanced chronic kidney disease. Thrombocytopenia was seen in several patients, and hyperosmia and/or hyperacusis were reported recurrently. A p.Asp523Asn mutation in a Polish patient, associated with the typical cerebrorenal spectrum but with late cataract (10 year), was also evident in two milder affected Italian brothers with ocular involvement of similar progression. CONCLUSIONS We have identified clinical features in 28 patients with suspected Lowe syndrome that had not been recognized in Lowe syndrome prior to our study. We also provide further evidence that OCRL mutations cause a phenotypic continuum with selective and/or time-dependent organ involvement. At least some of these mutants might exhibit a genotype-phenotype correlation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2015
Deposited On:21 Jan 2016 10:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0931-041X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-014-3013-2
PubMed ID:25480730

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