Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Clinical outcome, biochemical and therapeutic follow-up in 14 Austrian patients with Long-Chain 3-Hydroxy Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (LCHADD)


Karall, Daniela; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Kogelnig, Katharina; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Maier, Esther M; Möslinger, Dorothea; Plecko, Barbara; Sperl, Wolfgang; Volkmar, Barbara; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine (2015). Clinical outcome, biochemical and therapeutic follow-up in 14 Austrian patients with Long-Chain 3-Hydroxy Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (LCHADD). Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, 10(21):online.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: LCHADD is a long-fatty acid oxidation disorder with immediate symptoms and long-term complications. We evaluated data on clinical status, biochemical parameters, therapeutic regimens and outcome of Austrian LCHADD patients.
STUDY DESIGN: Clinical and outcome data including history, diagnosis, short- and long-term manifestations, growth, psychomotor development, hospitalizations, therapy of 14 Austrian patients with LCHADD were evaluated. Biochemically, we evaluated creatine kinase (CK) and acyl carnitine profiles.
RESULTS: All LCHADD patients are homozygous for the common mutation. Three are siblings. Diagnosis was first established biochemically. Nine/14 (64%) were prematures, with IRDS occurring in six. In nine (64%), diagnosis was established through newborn screening, the remaining five (36%) were diagnosed clinically. Four pregnancies were complicated by HELLP syndrome, one by preeclampsia. In two, intrauterine growth retardation and placental insufficiency were reported. Five were diagnosed with hepatopathy at some point, seven with cardiomyopathy and eight with retinopathy, clinically relevant only in one patient. Polyneuropathy is only present in one. Three patients have a PEG, one is regularly fed via NG-tube. Growth is normal in all, as well as psychomotor development, except for two extremely premature girls. In 11 patients, 165 episodes with elevated creatine kinase concentrations were observed with 6-31 (median 14) per patient; three have shown no elevated CK concentrations. Median total carnitine on therapy was 19 μmol/l (range 11-61). For 14 patients, there have been 181 hospitalizations (median 9 per patient), comprising 1337 in-patient-days. All centres adhere to treatment with a fat-defined diet; patients have between 15% and 40% of their energy intake from fat (median 29%), out of which between 20% and 80% are medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) (median 62%). Four patients have been treated with heptanoate (C7).
CONCLUSION: Our data show LCHADD outcome can be favourable. Growth and psychomotor development is normal, except in two prematures. Frequency of CK measurements decreases with age, correlating with a decreasing number of hospitalizations. About 50% develop complications affecting different organ systems. There is no relevant difference between the patients treated in the respective centers. Concluding from single case reports, anaplerotic therapy with heptanoate should be further evaluated.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: LCHADD is a long-fatty acid oxidation disorder with immediate symptoms and long-term complications. We evaluated data on clinical status, biochemical parameters, therapeutic regimens and outcome of Austrian LCHADD patients.
STUDY DESIGN: Clinical and outcome data including history, diagnosis, short- and long-term manifestations, growth, psychomotor development, hospitalizations, therapy of 14 Austrian patients with LCHADD were evaluated. Biochemically, we evaluated creatine kinase (CK) and acyl carnitine profiles.
RESULTS: All LCHADD patients are homozygous for the common mutation. Three are siblings. Diagnosis was first established biochemically. Nine/14 (64%) were prematures, with IRDS occurring in six. In nine (64%), diagnosis was established through newborn screening, the remaining five (36%) were diagnosed clinically. Four pregnancies were complicated by HELLP syndrome, one by preeclampsia. In two, intrauterine growth retardation and placental insufficiency were reported. Five were diagnosed with hepatopathy at some point, seven with cardiomyopathy and eight with retinopathy, clinically relevant only in one patient. Polyneuropathy is only present in one. Three patients have a PEG, one is regularly fed via NG-tube. Growth is normal in all, as well as psychomotor development, except for two extremely premature girls. In 11 patients, 165 episodes with elevated creatine kinase concentrations were observed with 6-31 (median 14) per patient; three have shown no elevated CK concentrations. Median total carnitine on therapy was 19 μmol/l (range 11-61). For 14 patients, there have been 181 hospitalizations (median 9 per patient), comprising 1337 in-patient-days. All centres adhere to treatment with a fat-defined diet; patients have between 15% and 40% of their energy intake from fat (median 29%), out of which between 20% and 80% are medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) (median 62%). Four patients have been treated with heptanoate (C7).
CONCLUSION: Our data show LCHADD outcome can be favourable. Growth and psychomotor development is normal, except in two prematures. Frequency of CK measurements decreases with age, correlating with a decreasing number of hospitalizations. About 50% develop complications affecting different organ systems. There is no relevant difference between the patients treated in the respective centers. Concluding from single case reports, anaplerotic therapy with heptanoate should be further evaluated.

Statistics

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

30 downloads since deposited on 21 Jan 2016
15 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:21 Jan 2016 13:03
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 17:22
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1750-1172
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13023-015-0236-7
PubMed ID:25888220

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 466kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations