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Where Oncologic and Surgical Complication Scoring Systems Collide: Time for a New Consensus for CRS/HIPEC


Lehmann, Kuno; Eshmuminov, Dilmurodjon; Slankamenac, Ksenija; Kranzbühler, Benedict; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Vonlanthen, René; Gertsch, Philippe (2016). Where Oncologic and Surgical Complication Scoring Systems Collide: Time for a New Consensus for CRS/HIPEC. World Journal of Surgery, 40(5):1075-1081.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Morbidity and mortality rates after cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) are important quality parameters to compare peritoneal surface malignancy centers. A major problem to assess postoperative outcomes among centers is the inconsistent reporting due to two coexisting systems, the diagnose-based common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) classification and the therapy-oriented Clavien-Dindo classification. We therefore assessed and compared both reporting systems. PATIENTS AND METHODS Complications after CRS/HIPEC were recorded in 147 consecutive patients and independently graded by an expert board using both systems. In a next step, a group of residents, experienced surgeons, and medical oncologists evaluated a set of twelve real complications, either with the Clavien-Dindo or CTCAE classification. RESULTS The postoperative complication rate after CRS/HIPEC was 37 % (54/147), 6.8 % (10/147) were reoperated, and three (2 %) patients died. The most frequent complications were intestinal fistula or abscess, pulmonary complications, and ileus. Grading of complications with the CTCAE classification resulted in a significantly higher major morbidity rate compared to the Clavien-Dindo classification (25 vs. 8 %, p = 0.001). Evaluating a set of complications, residents, surgeons, and oncologists correctly assessed significantly more complications with the Clavien-Dindo compared to the CTCEA classification (p < 0.001). In addition, all participants evaluated the Clavien-Dindo classification as more simple. Residents (p < 0.001) and surgeons (p < 0.01) required less time with the Clavien-Dindo classification; there was no difference for oncologist. CONCLUSION In conclusion, our data indicate that there is a different interpretation of severity grades of complications after CRS/HIPEC between the two classifications. There is a need for a common language in the field of CRS/HIPEC, which should be defined by a new consensus to compare surgical outcomes.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Morbidity and mortality rates after cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) are important quality parameters to compare peritoneal surface malignancy centers. A major problem to assess postoperative outcomes among centers is the inconsistent reporting due to two coexisting systems, the diagnose-based common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) classification and the therapy-oriented Clavien-Dindo classification. We therefore assessed and compared both reporting systems. PATIENTS AND METHODS Complications after CRS/HIPEC were recorded in 147 consecutive patients and independently graded by an expert board using both systems. In a next step, a group of residents, experienced surgeons, and medical oncologists evaluated a set of twelve real complications, either with the Clavien-Dindo or CTCAE classification. RESULTS The postoperative complication rate after CRS/HIPEC was 37 % (54/147), 6.8 % (10/147) were reoperated, and three (2 %) patients died. The most frequent complications were intestinal fistula or abscess, pulmonary complications, and ileus. Grading of complications with the CTCAE classification resulted in a significantly higher major morbidity rate compared to the Clavien-Dindo classification (25 vs. 8 %, p = 0.001). Evaluating a set of complications, residents, surgeons, and oncologists correctly assessed significantly more complications with the Clavien-Dindo compared to the CTCEA classification (p < 0.001). In addition, all participants evaluated the Clavien-Dindo classification as more simple. Residents (p < 0.001) and surgeons (p < 0.01) required less time with the Clavien-Dindo classification; there was no difference for oncologist. CONCLUSION In conclusion, our data indicate that there is a different interpretation of severity grades of complications after CRS/HIPEC between the two classifications. There is a need for a common language in the field of CRS/HIPEC, which should be defined by a new consensus to compare surgical outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:21 Jan 2016 14:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0364-2313
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-015-3366-0
PubMed ID:26669784

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