Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Hepatocellular carcinoma and lifestyles


Saran, Uttara; Humar, Bostjan; Kolly, Philippe; Dufour, Jean-François (2016). Hepatocellular carcinoma and lifestyles. Journal of Hepatology, 64(1):203-214.

Abstract

The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma occurs over pre-existing chronic liver diseases that share cirrhosis as an endpoint. In the last decade, a strong association between lifestyle and hepatocellular carcinoma has become evident. Abundance of energy-rich food and sedentary lifestyles have caused metabolic conditions such as obesity and diabetes mellitus to become global epidemics. Obesity and diabetes mellitus are both tightly linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and also increase hepatocellular carcinoma risk independent of cirrhosis. Emerging data suggest that physical activity not only counteracts obesity, diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, but also reduces cancer risk. Physical activity exerts significant anticancer effects in the absence of metabolic disorders. Here, we present a systematic review on lifestyles and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Abstract

The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma occurs over pre-existing chronic liver diseases that share cirrhosis as an endpoint. In the last decade, a strong association between lifestyle and hepatocellular carcinoma has become evident. Abundance of energy-rich food and sedentary lifestyles have caused metabolic conditions such as obesity and diabetes mellitus to become global epidemics. Obesity and diabetes mellitus are both tightly linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and also increase hepatocellular carcinoma risk independent of cirrhosis. Emerging data suggest that physical activity not only counteracts obesity, diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, but also reduces cancer risk. Physical activity exerts significant anticancer effects in the absence of metabolic disorders. Here, we present a systematic review on lifestyles and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
19 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
18 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2016
Deposited On:26 Jan 2016 11:37
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 09:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-8278
Additional Information:Review
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2015.08.028
PubMed ID:26341826

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library