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Where are we heading to in pharmacological IBD therapy?


Rogler, Gerhard (2015). Where are we heading to in pharmacological IBD therapy? Pharmacological Research, 100:220-7.

Abstract

After a relatively long time of failed developments and negative clinical trials in pharmacological inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy we now phase a time of a great number of successful studies and new therapy principles that will most likely make it into clinical practice. This will change the landscape of IBD therapy in future markedly. Many new therapeutic principles have been developed and old ones that seemed to have failed such as anti-sense technology suddenly now provide promising results. Some initially promising therapies will need further development or have failed such as Trichuris suis ova therapy (but not helminth therapy in general), CCR9 targeted therapies or recombinant IL-10. In contrast anti-leukocate trafficking therapies appear to be quite promising. Vedolizumab is the first in class anti-integrin antibody that was approved for the therapy of CD and UC recently. Other anti-integrin antibodies and small molecule adhesion inhibitors will most likely be approved in the next years for IBD therapy. Tofacitinib, a small molecule JAK inhibitor, is a promising candidate for the treatment of UC. Phosphatidylcholine may be a future option for patients with 5-ASA refractory UC or 5-ASA intolerance. The preliminary data for Mongersen, a Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide, are promising despite some concerns about long term effect of TGFβ induction. Anti IL6 strategies will hopefully be further evaluated keeping in mind the caveat of a lack of CRP induction in anti-IL6 treated patients. Stem cell transplantation will become an option for patients that have experienced failure of established medications. Fecal microbiota transplantation and also perhaps combined probiotic therapy is a field that will be evaluated in more detail in the near future especially for UC patients. Based on these new developments treatment algorithms need to be updated. This review will reflect these current developments and give a perspective for future IBD therapy.

Abstract

After a relatively long time of failed developments and negative clinical trials in pharmacological inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy we now phase a time of a great number of successful studies and new therapy principles that will most likely make it into clinical practice. This will change the landscape of IBD therapy in future markedly. Many new therapeutic principles have been developed and old ones that seemed to have failed such as anti-sense technology suddenly now provide promising results. Some initially promising therapies will need further development or have failed such as Trichuris suis ova therapy (but not helminth therapy in general), CCR9 targeted therapies or recombinant IL-10. In contrast anti-leukocate trafficking therapies appear to be quite promising. Vedolizumab is the first in class anti-integrin antibody that was approved for the therapy of CD and UC recently. Other anti-integrin antibodies and small molecule adhesion inhibitors will most likely be approved in the next years for IBD therapy. Tofacitinib, a small molecule JAK inhibitor, is a promising candidate for the treatment of UC. Phosphatidylcholine may be a future option for patients with 5-ASA refractory UC or 5-ASA intolerance. The preliminary data for Mongersen, a Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide, are promising despite some concerns about long term effect of TGFβ induction. Anti IL6 strategies will hopefully be further evaluated keeping in mind the caveat of a lack of CRP induction in anti-IL6 treated patients. Stem cell transplantation will become an option for patients that have experienced failure of established medications. Fecal microbiota transplantation and also perhaps combined probiotic therapy is a field that will be evaluated in more detail in the near future especially for UC patients. Based on these new developments treatment algorithms need to be updated. This review will reflect these current developments and give a perspective for future IBD therapy.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:26 Jan 2016 15:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:54
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1043-6618
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2015.07.005
PubMed ID:26277232

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