Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

White-Light or Narrow-Band Imaging Colonoscopy in Surveillance of Ulcerative Colitis: A Prospective Multicenter Study.


Leifeld, Ludger; Rogler, Gerhard; Stallmach, Andreas; Schmidt, Carsten; Zuber-Jerger, Ina; Hartmann, Franz; Plauth, Mathias; Drabik, Attyla; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Dienes, Hans Peter; Kruis, Wolfgang (2015). White-Light or Narrow-Band Imaging Colonoscopy in Surveillance of Ulcerative Colitis: A Prospective Multicenter Study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 13(10):1776-1781.e1.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Early detection of neoplastic lesions is essential in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis but the best technique of colonoscopy still is controversial.

METHODS

We performed a prospective multicenter study in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis. Two colonoscopies were performed in each patient within 3 weeks to 3 months. In white-light (WL) colonoscopy, stepwise random biopsy specimens (4 biopsy specimens every 10 cm), segmental random biopsies (2 biopsy specimens in 5 segments), and targeted biopsy specimens were taken. In NBI colonoscopy, segmental and targeted biopsy specimens were taken. The sequence of WL and NBI colonoscopy was randomized.

RESULTS

In 36 of 159 patients enrolled (22.6%), 54 lesions with intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) were found (51 low-grade, 3 high-grade). In WL colonoscopy we found 11 IN in stepwise biopsy specimens, 4 in segmental biopsy specimens, and 15 in targeted biopsy specimens. In NBI colonoscopy 7 IN were detected in segmental biopsy specimens and 24 IN were detected in targeted biopsy specimens. Almost all IN were found with one technique alone (κ value of WL vs NBI, -0.86; P < .001). Statistically equivalent numbers of IN were found in NBI colonoscopy with targeted and segmental biopsy specimens as in WL colonoscopy with targeted and stepwise biopsy specimens, but with fewer biopsy specimens (11.9 vs 38.6 biopsy specimens, respectively; P < .001), and less withdrawal time was necessary (23 vs 13 min, respectively; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

Stepwise biopsy specimens are indispensable in WL colonoscopy. The combination of targeted and segmental biopsy specimens in the NBI technique is as sensitive as targeted together with stepwise biopsy specimens in WL colonoscopy, but requires fewer biopsy specimens and less time. The highest sensitivity should be reached by combining the WL and NBI techniques by switching between the modes.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Early detection of neoplastic lesions is essential in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis but the best technique of colonoscopy still is controversial.

METHODS

We performed a prospective multicenter study in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis. Two colonoscopies were performed in each patient within 3 weeks to 3 months. In white-light (WL) colonoscopy, stepwise random biopsy specimens (4 biopsy specimens every 10 cm), segmental random biopsies (2 biopsy specimens in 5 segments), and targeted biopsy specimens were taken. In NBI colonoscopy, segmental and targeted biopsy specimens were taken. The sequence of WL and NBI colonoscopy was randomized.

RESULTS

In 36 of 159 patients enrolled (22.6%), 54 lesions with intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) were found (51 low-grade, 3 high-grade). In WL colonoscopy we found 11 IN in stepwise biopsy specimens, 4 in segmental biopsy specimens, and 15 in targeted biopsy specimens. In NBI colonoscopy 7 IN were detected in segmental biopsy specimens and 24 IN were detected in targeted biopsy specimens. Almost all IN were found with one technique alone (κ value of WL vs NBI, -0.86; P < .001). Statistically equivalent numbers of IN were found in NBI colonoscopy with targeted and segmental biopsy specimens as in WL colonoscopy with targeted and stepwise biopsy specimens, but with fewer biopsy specimens (11.9 vs 38.6 biopsy specimens, respectively; P < .001), and less withdrawal time was necessary (23 vs 13 min, respectively; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

Stepwise biopsy specimens are indispensable in WL colonoscopy. The combination of targeted and segmental biopsy specimens in the NBI technique is as sensitive as targeted together with stepwise biopsy specimens in WL colonoscopy, but requires fewer biopsy specimens and less time. The highest sensitivity should be reached by combining the WL and NBI techniques by switching between the modes.

Statistics

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:26 Jan 2016 15:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:54
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1542-3565
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2015.04.172
PubMed ID:25952309

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations