Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease patient's needs and problems from a nursing perspective


Burkhalter, Hanna; Stucki-Thür, Prisca; David, Birgit; Lorenz, Sven; Biotti, Beatrice; Rogler, Gerhard; Pittet, Valerie (2015). Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease patient's needs and problems from a nursing perspective. Digestion, 91(2):128-141.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In this study, we aimed at assessing Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients' needs and current nursing practice to investigate to what extent consensus statements (European Crohn's and Colitis Organization) on the nursing roles in caring for patients with IBD concur with local practice.
METHODS: We used a mixed-method convergent design to combine quantitative data prospectively collected in the Swiss IBD cohort study and qualitative data from structured interviews with IBD healthcare experts. Symptoms, quality of life, and anxiety and depression scores were retrieved from physician charts and patient self-reported questionnaires. Descriptive analyses were performed based on quantitative and qualitative data.
RESULTS: 230 patients of a single center were included, 60% of patients were males, and median age was 40 (range 18-85). The prevalence of abdominal pain was 42%. Self-reported data were obtained from 75 out of 230 patients. General health was perceived significantly lower compared with the general population (p < 0.001). Prevalence of tiredness was 73%; sleep problems, 78%; issues related to work, 20%; sexual constraints, 35%; diarrhea, 67%; being afraid of not finding a bathroom, 42%; depression, 11%; and anxiety symptoms, 23%. According to experts' interviews, the consensus statements are found mostly relevant with many recommendations that are not yet realized in clinical practice.
CONCLUSION: Identified prevalence may help clinicians in detecting patients at risk and improve patient management.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In this study, we aimed at assessing Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients' needs and current nursing practice to investigate to what extent consensus statements (European Crohn's and Colitis Organization) on the nursing roles in caring for patients with IBD concur with local practice.
METHODS: We used a mixed-method convergent design to combine quantitative data prospectively collected in the Swiss IBD cohort study and qualitative data from structured interviews with IBD healthcare experts. Symptoms, quality of life, and anxiety and depression scores were retrieved from physician charts and patient self-reported questionnaires. Descriptive analyses were performed based on quantitative and qualitative data.
RESULTS: 230 patients of a single center were included, 60% of patients were males, and median age was 40 (range 18-85). The prevalence of abdominal pain was 42%. Self-reported data were obtained from 75 out of 230 patients. General health was perceived significantly lower compared with the general population (p < 0.001). Prevalence of tiredness was 73%; sleep problems, 78%; issues related to work, 20%; sexual constraints, 35%; diarrhea, 67%; being afraid of not finding a bathroom, 42%; depression, 11%; and anxiety symptoms, 23%. According to experts' interviews, the consensus statements are found mostly relevant with many recommendations that are not yet realized in clinical practice.
CONCLUSION: Identified prevalence may help clinicians in detecting patients at risk and improve patient management.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

50 downloads since deposited on 26 Jan 2016
44 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:26 Jan 2016 15:44
Last Modified:26 May 2016 12:26
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0012-2823
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000371654
PubMed ID:25677558

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 875kB
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations