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Validation of a rapid, semiautomatic image analysis tool for measurement of gastric accommodation and emptying by magnetic resonance imaging


Banerjee, Sreerup; Dixit, Sudeepa; Fox, Mark; Pal, Anupam (2015). Validation of a rapid, semiautomatic image analysis tool for measurement of gastric accommodation and emptying by magnetic resonance imaging. American Journal Of Physiology. Gastrointestinal And Liver Physiology, 308(8):G652-G663.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advantages for the assessment of gastrointestinal structures and functions; however, processing MRI data is time consuming and this has limited uptake to a few specialist centers. This study introduces a semiautomatic image processing system for rapid analysis of gastrointestinal MRI. For assessment of simpler regions of interest (ROI) such as the stomach, the system generates virtual images along arbitrary planes that intersect the ROI edges in the original images. This generates seed points that are joined automatically to form contours on each adjacent two-dimensional image and reconstructed in three dimensions (3D). An alternative thresholding approach is available for rapid assessment of complex structures like the small intestine. For assessment of dynamic gastrointestinal function, such as gastric accommodation and emptying, the initial 3D reconstruction is used as reference to process adjacent image stacks automatically. This generates four-dimensional (4D) reconstructions of dynamic volume change over time. Compared with manual processing, this semiautomatic system reduced the user input required to analyze a MRI gastric emptying study (estimated 100 vs. 10,000 mouse clicks). This analysis was not subject to variation in volume measurements seen between three human observers. In conclusion, the image processing platform presented processed large volumes of MRI data, such as that produced by gastric accommodation and emptying studies, with minimal user input. 3D and 4D reconstructions of the stomach and, potentially, other gastrointestinal organs are produced faster and more accurately than manual methods. This system will facilitate the application of MRI in gastrointestinal research and clinical practice.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advantages for the assessment of gastrointestinal structures and functions; however, processing MRI data is time consuming and this has limited uptake to a few specialist centers. This study introduces a semiautomatic image processing system for rapid analysis of gastrointestinal MRI. For assessment of simpler regions of interest (ROI) such as the stomach, the system generates virtual images along arbitrary planes that intersect the ROI edges in the original images. This generates seed points that are joined automatically to form contours on each adjacent two-dimensional image and reconstructed in three dimensions (3D). An alternative thresholding approach is available for rapid assessment of complex structures like the small intestine. For assessment of dynamic gastrointestinal function, such as gastric accommodation and emptying, the initial 3D reconstruction is used as reference to process adjacent image stacks automatically. This generates four-dimensional (4D) reconstructions of dynamic volume change over time. Compared with manual processing, this semiautomatic system reduced the user input required to analyze a MRI gastric emptying study (estimated 100 vs. 10,000 mouse clicks). This analysis was not subject to variation in volume measurements seen between three human observers. In conclusion, the image processing platform presented processed large volumes of MRI data, such as that produced by gastric accommodation and emptying studies, with minimal user input. 3D and 4D reconstructions of the stomach and, potentially, other gastrointestinal organs are produced faster and more accurately than manual methods. This system will facilitate the application of MRI in gastrointestinal research and clinical practice.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 April 2015
Deposited On:28 Jan 2016 10:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:56
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0193-1857
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpgi.00095.2014
PubMed ID:25540229

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