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Frequency and correlates of DSM-5 attenuated psychosis syndrome in a sample of adolescent inpatients with nonpsychotic psychiatric disorders


Gerstenberg, Miriam; Hauser, Marta; Al-Jadiri, Aseel; Sheridan, Eva M; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Borenstein, Yehonatan; Vernal, Ditte L; David, Lisa; Saito, Ema; Landers, Sara E; Carella, Morgan; Singh, Sukhbir; Carbon, Maren; Jiménez-Fernández, Sara; Birnbaum, Michael L; Auther, Andrea; Carrión, Ricardo E; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Kane, John M; Walitza, Susanne; Correll, Christoph U (2015). Frequency and correlates of DSM-5 attenuated psychosis syndrome in a sample of adolescent inpatients with nonpsychotic psychiatric disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 76(11):e1449-e1458.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: DSM-5 conceptualized attenuated psychosis syndrome (APS) as self-contained rather than as a risk syndrome, including it under "Conditions for Further Study," but also as a codable/billable condition in the main section. Since many major mental disorders emerge during adolescence, we assessed the frequency and characteristics of APS in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.
METHODS: Consecutively recruited adolescents hospitalized for nonpsychotic disorders (September 2009-May 2013) were divided into APS youth versus non-APS youth, based on the Structured Interview of Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) and according to DSM-5 criteria, and compared across multiple characteristics.
RESULTS: Of 89 adolescents (mean ± SD age = 15.1 ± 1.6 years), 21 (23.6%) had APS. Compared to non-APS, APS was associated with more comorbid disorders (2.7 ± 1.0 vs 2.2 ± 1.3), major depressive disorder (61.9% vs 27.9%), oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder (52.4% vs 25.0%), and personality disorder traits (57.1% vs 7.4%, the only diagnostic category surviving Bonferroni correction). APS youth were more severely ill, having higher SIPS total positive, negative, and general symptoms; Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total and positive scores; depression and global illness ratings; and lower Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Conversely, Young Mania Rating Scale scores, suicidal behavior, prescribed psychotropic medications, and mental disorder awareness were similar between APS and non-APS groups. In multivariable analysis, lowest GAF score in the past year (odds ratio [OR] = 51.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.46-2,439.0) and social isolation (OR = 27.52; 95% CI, 3.36-313.87) were independently associated with APS (r(2) = 0.302, P < .0001). Although psychotic disorders were excluded, 65.2% (APS = 57.1%, non-APS = 67.7%, P = .38) received antipsychotics.
CONCLUSION: One in 4 nonpsychotic adolescent inpatients met DSM-5 criteria for APS. APS youth were more impaired, showing a complex entanglement with a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, including depression, impulse-control, and, especially, emerging personality disorders.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01383915.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: DSM-5 conceptualized attenuated psychosis syndrome (APS) as self-contained rather than as a risk syndrome, including it under "Conditions for Further Study," but also as a codable/billable condition in the main section. Since many major mental disorders emerge during adolescence, we assessed the frequency and characteristics of APS in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.
METHODS: Consecutively recruited adolescents hospitalized for nonpsychotic disorders (September 2009-May 2013) were divided into APS youth versus non-APS youth, based on the Structured Interview of Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) and according to DSM-5 criteria, and compared across multiple characteristics.
RESULTS: Of 89 adolescents (mean ± SD age = 15.1 ± 1.6 years), 21 (23.6%) had APS. Compared to non-APS, APS was associated with more comorbid disorders (2.7 ± 1.0 vs 2.2 ± 1.3), major depressive disorder (61.9% vs 27.9%), oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder (52.4% vs 25.0%), and personality disorder traits (57.1% vs 7.4%, the only diagnostic category surviving Bonferroni correction). APS youth were more severely ill, having higher SIPS total positive, negative, and general symptoms; Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total and positive scores; depression and global illness ratings; and lower Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Conversely, Young Mania Rating Scale scores, suicidal behavior, prescribed psychotropic medications, and mental disorder awareness were similar between APS and non-APS groups. In multivariable analysis, lowest GAF score in the past year (odds ratio [OR] = 51.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.46-2,439.0) and social isolation (OR = 27.52; 95% CI, 3.36-313.87) were independently associated with APS (r(2) = 0.302, P < .0001). Although psychotic disorders were excluded, 65.2% (APS = 57.1%, non-APS = 67.7%, P = .38) received antipsychotics.
CONCLUSION: One in 4 nonpsychotic adolescent inpatients met DSM-5 criteria for APS. APS youth were more impaired, showing a complex entanglement with a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, including depression, impulse-control, and, especially, emerging personality disorders.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01383915.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2015
Deposited On:01 Feb 2016 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:56
Publisher:Physicians Postgraduate Press
ISSN:0160-6689
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.14m09435
PubMed ID:26646040

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