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The NFκB-inducing kinase is essential for the developmental programming of skin-resident and IL-17-producing γδ T cells - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Mair, Florian; Joller, Stefanie; Hoeppli, Romy; Onder, Lucas; Hahn, Matthias; Ludewig, Burkhard; Waisman, Ari; Becher, Burkhard (2015). The NFκB-inducing kinase is essential for the developmental programming of skin-resident and IL-17-producing γδ T cells. eLife, 4:e10087.

Abstract

γδ T cells contribute to first line immune defense, particularly through their ability for rapid production of proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine profile of γδ T cells is hard-wired already during thymic development. Yet, the molecular pathways underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Here we show that signaling via the NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK) is essential for the formation of a fully functional γδ T cell compartment. In the absence of NIK, development of Vγ5(+) dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) was halted in the embryonic thymus, and impaired NIK function caused a selective loss of IL-17 expression by γδ T cells. Using a novel conditional mutant of NIK, we could show in vivo that NIK signaling in thymic epithelial cells is essential for the thymic hardwiring of γδ T cell cytokine production.

Abstract

γδ T cells contribute to first line immune defense, particularly through their ability for rapid production of proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine profile of γδ T cells is hard-wired already during thymic development. Yet, the molecular pathways underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Here we show that signaling via the NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK) is essential for the formation of a fully functional γδ T cell compartment. In the absence of NIK, development of Vγ5(+) dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) was halted in the embryonic thymus, and impaired NIK function caused a selective loss of IL-17 expression by γδ T cells. Using a novel conditional mutant of NIK, we could show in vivo that NIK signaling in thymic epithelial cells is essential for the thymic hardwiring of γδ T cell cytokine production.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:01 Feb 2016 12:35
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 17:23
Publisher:eLife Sciences Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2050-084X
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10087
PubMed ID:26637788

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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