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Work-related burden on physicians and nurses working in neonatal intensive care units: a survey


Hauser, Nina; Natalucci, Giancarlo; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Klein, Sabine; Fauchère, Jean-Claude (2015). Work-related burden on physicians and nurses working in neonatal intensive care units: a survey. Journal of Neonatology and Clinical Pediatrics, 2(2):013.

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed at exploring the type, degree, and duration of work-related burden on neonatal physicians and nurses working in tertiary level neonatal intensive care units, its impact on their private life, and at assessing which coping strategies were found helpful.
Methods: Transversal descriptive study using an anonymous
questionnaire.
Results: Fifty-two neonatal physicians and 60 nurses took part in this survey (response rate 77%). Altogether, 78% stated that the difficult medical and ethical dilemmas represent a burden to them. 87% experienced this work burden as momentary, and 12% as long-lasting. In 40% of the respondents, their private life was affected. Exhaustion was the most frequently cited stress symptom (physicians 25%, nurses 15%). Close to 90% of the caregivers were
offered a platform for team debriefings and discussions or pastoral assistance by their hospital, but most of the respondents found relief from stress through discussions with family members and friends (20%), and through their hobbies (15%), or both (43%).
Conclusion: Working in a NICU environment represents a burden for the majority of neonatal health care providers. Exhaustion was the most frequent symptom. Social contacts with family and friends and hobbies are the coping strategies found most helpful. Staff meetings, debriefing platforms and pastoral assistance help alleviate work-related stress.
Keywords: Coping; Coping behavior; Exhaustion; Work-related stress; NICU

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed at exploring the type, degree, and duration of work-related burden on neonatal physicians and nurses working in tertiary level neonatal intensive care units, its impact on their private life, and at assessing which coping strategies were found helpful.
Methods: Transversal descriptive study using an anonymous
questionnaire.
Results: Fifty-two neonatal physicians and 60 nurses took part in this survey (response rate 77%). Altogether, 78% stated that the difficult medical and ethical dilemmas represent a burden to them. 87% experienced this work burden as momentary, and 12% as long-lasting. In 40% of the respondents, their private life was affected. Exhaustion was the most frequently cited stress symptom (physicians 25%, nurses 15%). Close to 90% of the caregivers were
offered a platform for team debriefings and discussions or pastoral assistance by their hospital, but most of the respondents found relief from stress through discussions with family members and friends (20%), and through their hobbies (15%), or both (43%).
Conclusion: Working in a NICU environment represents a burden for the majority of neonatal health care providers. Exhaustion was the most frequent symptom. Social contacts with family and friends and hobbies are the coping strategies found most helpful. Staff meetings, debriefing platforms and pastoral assistance help alleviate work-related stress.
Keywords: Coping; Coping behavior; Exhaustion; Work-related stress; NICU

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2015
Deposited On:02 Feb 2016 07:55
Last Modified:26 May 2016 05:58
Publisher:Herald
ISSN:2378-878X
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.heraldopenaccess.us/fulltext/Neonatology-&-Clinical-Pediatrics/Work-Related-Burden-on-%20Physicians-and-Nurses-Working-in-Neonatal-Intensive-Care-Units-A-Survey.php
Related URLs:http://www.heraldopenaccess.us/journals/Neonatology-&-Clinical-Pediatrics/ (Publisher)

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