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Second-order motion-compensated spin echo diffusion tensor imaging of the human heart


Stoeck, Christian T; von Deuster, Constantin; Genet, Martin; Atkinson, David; Kozerke, Sebastian (2016). Second-order motion-compensated spin echo diffusion tensor imaging of the human heart. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 75(4):1669-1676.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Myocardial microstructure has been challenging to probe in vivo. Spin echo-based diffusion-weighted sequences allow for single-shot acquisitions but are highly sensitive to cardiac motion. In this study, the use of second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding was compared with first-order motion-compensated diffusion-weighted imaging during systolic contraction of the heart.
METHODS: First- and second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding gradients were incorporated into a triggered single-shot spin echo sequence. The effect of contractile motion on the apparent diffusion coefficients and tensor orientations was investigated in vivo from basal to apical level of the heart.
RESULTS: Second-order motion compensation was found to increase the range of systolic trigger delays from 30%-55% to 15%-77% peak systole at the apex and from 25%-50% to 15%-79% peak systole at the base. Diffusion tensor analysis yielded more physiological transmural distributions when using second-order motion-compensated diffusion tensor imaging.
CONCLUSION: Higher-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding decreases the sensitivity to cardiac motion, thereby enabling cardiac DTI over a wider range of time points during systolic contraction of the heart. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Myocardial microstructure has been challenging to probe in vivo. Spin echo-based diffusion-weighted sequences allow for single-shot acquisitions but are highly sensitive to cardiac motion. In this study, the use of second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding was compared with first-order motion-compensated diffusion-weighted imaging during systolic contraction of the heart.
METHODS: First- and second-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding gradients were incorporated into a triggered single-shot spin echo sequence. The effect of contractile motion on the apparent diffusion coefficients and tensor orientations was investigated in vivo from basal to apical level of the heart.
RESULTS: Second-order motion compensation was found to increase the range of systolic trigger delays from 30%-55% to 15%-77% peak systole at the apex and from 25%-50% to 15%-79% peak systole at the base. Diffusion tensor analysis yielded more physiological transmural distributions when using second-order motion-compensated diffusion tensor imaging.
CONCLUSION: Higher-order motion-compensated diffusion encoding decreases the sensitivity to cardiac motion, thereby enabling cardiac DTI over a wider range of time points during systolic contraction of the heart. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:diffusion tensor imaging; in vivo cardiac DTI; myocardial microstructure; spin-echo
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:03 Feb 2016 15:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:57
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0740-3194
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.25784
PubMed ID:26033456

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