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Optimization of LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer parameters for the identification of ADP-ribosylation sites


Rosenthal, Florian; Nanni, Paolo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Hottiger, Michael O (2015). Optimization of LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer parameters for the identification of ADP-ribosylation sites. Journal of Proteome Research, 14(9):4072-4079.

Abstract

ADP-ribosylation of proteins alters their function or provides a scaffold for the recruitment of other proteins, thereby regulating several important cellular processes. Mono- or poly-ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by different ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) that have different subcellular localizations and modify different amino acid acceptor sites. However, our knowledge of ADP-ribosylated proteins and their acceptor amino acids is still limited due to the lack of suitable mass spectrometry (MS) tools. Here, we describe an MS approach for the detection of ADP-ribosylated peptides and identification of the ADP-ribose acceptor sites, combining higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The presence of diagnostic ions of ADP-ribose in the HCD spectra allowed us to detect putative ADP-ribosylated peptides to target in a second LC-MS/MS analysis. The combination of HCD with ETD fragmentation gave a more comprehensive coverage of ADP-ribosylation sites than that with HCD alone. We successfully identified different ADP-ribose acceptor sites on several in vitro modified proteins. The combination of optimized HCD and ETD methods may be applied to complex samples, allowing comprehensive identification of ADP-ribosylation acceptor sites.

Abstract

ADP-ribosylation of proteins alters their function or provides a scaffold for the recruitment of other proteins, thereby regulating several important cellular processes. Mono- or poly-ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by different ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) that have different subcellular localizations and modify different amino acid acceptor sites. However, our knowledge of ADP-ribosylated proteins and their acceptor amino acids is still limited due to the lack of suitable mass spectrometry (MS) tools. Here, we describe an MS approach for the detection of ADP-ribosylated peptides and identification of the ADP-ribose acceptor sites, combining higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The presence of diagnostic ions of ADP-ribose in the HCD spectra allowed us to detect putative ADP-ribosylated peptides to target in a second LC-MS/MS analysis. The combination of HCD with ETD fragmentation gave a more comprehensive coverage of ADP-ribosylation sites than that with HCD alone. We successfully identified different ADP-ribose acceptor sites on several in vitro modified proteins. The combination of optimized HCD and ETD methods may be applied to complex samples, allowing comprehensive identification of ADP-ribosylation acceptor sites.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:4 September 2015
Deposited On:29 Jan 2016 12:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:59
Publisher:American Chemical Society (ACS)
ISSN:1535-3893
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jproteome.5b00432
PubMed ID:26211397

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