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Talking intervention: foreign policy frames and their conditional impact on individual attitudes


Haack, P (2007). Talking intervention: foreign policy frames and their conditional impact on individual attitudes. Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller.

Abstract

Given the rising importance of the global media and the relative unwillingness of democratic publics to accept casualties in war, decision makers have increasingly relied on the strategic dissemination of rhetoric in order to justify military engagements. They "talk intervention", that is, they justify foreign engagements in terms of an emerging global norm that finds the international community "responsible to protect". Adversaries of interventions, in contrast, emphasize the inherent uncertainties and risks associated with such undertakings, taking advantage of the "body-bag-effect". This book identifies prevalent foreign policy frames and analyzes their impact on individual attitudes towards foreign policy decisions. It argues that framing effects can be best understood as an interaction between message content and personal traits. A case study on Germany bolsters this argument, providing experimental evidence that interventionist talking and its counter-rationale exert some influence on the formation of political preferences. It also shows that the magnitude of this influence is very much contingent on the individuals' political sophistication and prior dispositions.

Abstract

Given the rising importance of the global media and the relative unwillingness of democratic publics to accept casualties in war, decision makers have increasingly relied on the strategic dissemination of rhetoric in order to justify military engagements. They "talk intervention", that is, they justify foreign engagements in terms of an emerging global norm that finds the international community "responsible to protect". Adversaries of interventions, in contrast, emphasize the inherent uncertainties and risks associated with such undertakings, taking advantage of the "body-bag-effect". This book identifies prevalent foreign policy frames and analyzes their impact on individual attitudes towards foreign policy decisions. It argues that framing effects can be best understood as an interaction between message content and personal traits. A case study on Germany bolsters this argument, providing experimental evidence that interventionist talking and its counter-rationale exert some influence on the formation of political preferences. It also shows that the magnitude of this influence is very much contingent on the individuals' political sophistication and prior dispositions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:29 Jan 2009 16:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:55
Publisher:VDM Verlag Dr. Müller
Number of Pages:184
ISBN:978-3836454988
Additional Information:Diplomarbeit wurde mit dem VEUK-Preis 2007 ausgezeichnet
Related URLs:http://www.vdm-verlag.de/ (Publisher)

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