Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Using accuracy of self-estimated interest type as a sign of career choice readiness in career assessment of secondary students


Hirschi, A; Läge, D (2008). Using accuracy of self-estimated interest type as a sign of career choice readiness in career assessment of secondary students. Journal of Career Assessment, 16(3):310-325.

Abstract

A frequent applied method in career assessment to elicit clients' self-concepts is asking them to predict their interest assessment results. Accuracy in estimating one's interest type is commonly taken as a sign of more self-awareness and career choice readiness. The study evaluated the empirical relation of accuracy of self-estimation to career choice readiness within a sample of 350 Swiss secondary students in seventh grade. Overall, accuracy showed only weak relations to career choice readiness. However, accurately estimating one's first interest type in a three-letter RIASEC interests code emerged as a sign of more vocational identity and total career choice readiness. Accuracy also correlated positively with interest profile consistency, differentiation, and congruence to career aspirations. Implications of the results for career counseling and assessment practice are presented.

Abstract

A frequent applied method in career assessment to elicit clients' self-concepts is asking them to predict their interest assessment results. Accuracy in estimating one's interest type is commonly taken as a sign of more self-awareness and career choice readiness. The study evaluated the empirical relation of accuracy of self-estimation to career choice readiness within a sample of 350 Swiss secondary students in seventh grade. Overall, accuracy showed only weak relations to career choice readiness. However, accurately estimating one's first interest type in a three-letter RIASEC interests code emerged as a sign of more vocational identity and total career choice readiness. Accuracy also correlated positively with interest profile consistency, differentiation, and congruence to career aspirations. Implications of the results for career counseling and assessment practice are presented.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 30 Jan 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:August 2008
Deposited On:30 Jan 2009 11:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:55
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:1069-0727
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072708317372

Download