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Est-ce qu’en discuter fait la différence ? Opinions de jeunes adultes atteints de maladies chroniques après avoir été transférés vers des soins pour adultes


Suris, J-C; Rutishauser, C; Akré, C (2015). Est-ce qu’en discuter fait la différence ? Opinions de jeunes adultes atteints de maladies chroniques après avoir été transférés vers des soins pour adultes. Archives de Pédiatrie, 22(3):267-271.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The goal of transition in healthcare for young people with chronic illnesses is to maximize their functioning and potential. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether young adults with chronic illnesses found that the transition to adult care was easier when the transition was discussed in advance with their pediatric specialist.
METHODS: Two groups were created according to whether patients had discussed (n=70) or not (n=22) the transition with their pediatric specialist and compared regarding demographic and health-related variables. All the significant variables at the bivariate level were included in a backward stepwise logistic regression.
RESULTS: Youth who had discussed the transition were significantly more likely to feel ready for the transfer (72.9% vs 45.5%) and accompanied (58.6% vs 27. %) during transfer, to have consulted their specialist for adults (60.0% vs 31.8%), and seen their doctor without the presence of their parents (70.0% vs 40.9%). At the multivariate level, only feeling accompanied during transfer (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.56) and having consulted their specialist for adults (aOR: 4.14) remained significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Preparing chronically ill youths for transfer to adult care appears to be beneficial for them. However, transfer is only a small part of the much broader transition that is preparation for adult life. A well-planned transition should allow these young people to reach their full potential.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The goal of transition in healthcare for young people with chronic illnesses is to maximize their functioning and potential. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether young adults with chronic illnesses found that the transition to adult care was easier when the transition was discussed in advance with their pediatric specialist.
METHODS: Two groups were created according to whether patients had discussed (n=70) or not (n=22) the transition with their pediatric specialist and compared regarding demographic and health-related variables. All the significant variables at the bivariate level were included in a backward stepwise logistic regression.
RESULTS: Youth who had discussed the transition were significantly more likely to feel ready for the transfer (72.9% vs 45.5%) and accompanied (58.6% vs 27. %) during transfer, to have consulted their specialist for adults (60.0% vs 31.8%), and seen their doctor without the presence of their parents (70.0% vs 40.9%). At the multivariate level, only feeling accompanied during transfer (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.56) and having consulted their specialist for adults (aOR: 4.14) remained significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Preparing chronically ill youths for transfer to adult care appears to be beneficial for them. However, transfer is only a small part of the much broader transition that is preparation for adult life. A well-planned transition should allow these young people to reach their full potential.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Does talking about it make a difference? Opinions of chronically ill young adults after being transferred to adult care
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:French
Date:March 2015
Deposited On:28 Jan 2016 15:16
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 11:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0929-693X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arcped.2014.12.001
PubMed ID:25649648

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