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The role of microfat grafting in facial contouring


Lindenblatt, Nicole; van Hulle, Astrid; Verpaele, Alexis M; Tonnard, Patrick L (2015). The role of microfat grafting in facial contouring. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 35(7):763-771.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Congenital hypoplasia of facial bones has traditionally been treated by orthognathic surgery. However, the inherent invasiveness of orthognathic surgery often leads to a high complication rate. Facial fat grafting could be a less invasive method to correct facial deformities.
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of microfat grafting for facial contouring.
METHODS: This retrospective chart review evaluated 166 patients who were treated with microfat grafting for maxillary and/or mandibular hypoplasia. Pretreatment and posttreatment photographs were compared regarding improvement of facial contour, and complications were recorded.
RESULTS: The follow-up period ranged from 4 months to 10 years (mean, 2 years 7 months). Thirty-eight percent of the patients had a refill procedure 6 or more months after the first procedure. A majority of the evaluated patients stated that they benefited from the microfat grafting, with ratings of excellent (50%), sufficient (48%), and poor (2%). Complications included visible fat lobules under the lower eyelid skin (7%), which was seen during the first 4 years and was resolved by changing the injection cannulae and technique, and fat resorption, which was seen in all patients, with a clinical range from ±15% in the immobile malar area and chin region to ±50% in the mobile lip area.
CONCLUSIONS: Facial microfat grafting is a valuable alternative to more complicated advancement osetotomies being performed in patients solely for aesthetic reasons. The low morbidity and rapid recovery make facial microfat grafting a welcome tool in the armamentarium of the modern facial aesthetic surgeon.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Congenital hypoplasia of facial bones has traditionally been treated by orthognathic surgery. However, the inherent invasiveness of orthognathic surgery often leads to a high complication rate. Facial fat grafting could be a less invasive method to correct facial deformities.
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of microfat grafting for facial contouring.
METHODS: This retrospective chart review evaluated 166 patients who were treated with microfat grafting for maxillary and/or mandibular hypoplasia. Pretreatment and posttreatment photographs were compared regarding improvement of facial contour, and complications were recorded.
RESULTS: The follow-up period ranged from 4 months to 10 years (mean, 2 years 7 months). Thirty-eight percent of the patients had a refill procedure 6 or more months after the first procedure. A majority of the evaluated patients stated that they benefited from the microfat grafting, with ratings of excellent (50%), sufficient (48%), and poor (2%). Complications included visible fat lobules under the lower eyelid skin (7%), which was seen during the first 4 years and was resolved by changing the injection cannulae and technique, and fat resorption, which was seen in all patients, with a clinical range from ±15% in the immobile malar area and chin region to ±50% in the mobile lip area.
CONCLUSIONS: Facial microfat grafting is a valuable alternative to more complicated advancement osetotomies being performed in patients solely for aesthetic reasons. The low morbidity and rapid recovery make facial microfat grafting a welcome tool in the armamentarium of the modern facial aesthetic surgeon.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2015
Deposited On:15 Feb 2016 11:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:02
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1090-820X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjv083
PubMed ID:26038369

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