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Organellar channels and transporters


Xu, Haoxing; Martinoia, Enrico; Szabo, Ildiko (2015). Organellar channels and transporters. Cell Calcium, 58(1):1-10.

Abstract

Decades of intensive research have led to the discovery of most plasma membrane ion channels and transporters and the characterization of their physiological functions. In contrast, although over 80% of transport processes occur inside the cells, the ion flux mechanisms across intracellular membranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) are difficult to investigate and remain poorly understood. Recent technical advances in super-resolution microscopy, organellar electrophysiology, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed a large step forward in the research of intracellular ion transport. Many new organellar channels are molecularly identified and electrophysiologically characterized. Additionally, molecular identification of many of these ion channels/transporters has made it possible to study their physiological functions by genetic and pharmacological means. For example, organellar channels have been shown to regulate important cellular processes such as programmed cell death and photosynthesis, and are involved in many different pathologies. This special issue (SI) on organellar channels and transporters aims to provide a forum to discuss the recent advances and to define the standard and open questions in this exciting and rapidly developing field. Along this line, a new Gordon Research Conference dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of intracellular membrane transport proteins will be launched this coming summer.

Abstract

Decades of intensive research have led to the discovery of most plasma membrane ion channels and transporters and the characterization of their physiological functions. In contrast, although over 80% of transport processes occur inside the cells, the ion flux mechanisms across intracellular membranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) are difficult to investigate and remain poorly understood. Recent technical advances in super-resolution microscopy, organellar electrophysiology, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed a large step forward in the research of intracellular ion transport. Many new organellar channels are molecularly identified and electrophysiologically characterized. Additionally, molecular identification of many of these ion channels/transporters has made it possible to study their physiological functions by genetic and pharmacological means. For example, organellar channels have been shown to regulate important cellular processes such as programmed cell death and photosynthesis, and are involved in many different pathologies. This special issue (SI) on organellar channels and transporters aims to provide a forum to discuss the recent advances and to define the standard and open questions in this exciting and rapidly developing field. Along this line, a new Gordon Research Conference dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of intracellular membrane transport proteins will be launched this coming summer.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:18 Feb 2016 13:34
Last Modified:11 Aug 2017 18:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0143-4160
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ceca.2015.02.006
PubMed ID:25795199

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