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Calcineurin Inhibitors Downregulate HNF-1β and May Affect the Outcome of HNF1B Patients After Renal Transplantation


Abstract

BACKGROUND Patients with HNF1B mutations develop progressive chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus (40-50%), and liver tests abnormalities (40-70%). In HNF1B patients who reach end-stage renal disease, single kidney transplantation (SKT) or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation can be considered. METHODS A retrospective multicenter study including 18 HNF1B patients receiving SKT or kidney-pancreas transplantation, and in vitro experiments including the characterization of the HNF1B expression after calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure. RESULTS After SKT, 50% of the HNF1B patients develop early posttransplantation diabetes mellitus, whereas 40% experience new-onset or severe worsening of preexisting abnormalities of liver tests, including severe cholestasis. In liver biopsies, disorders of the cholangiocytes primary cilium and various degrees of bile duct paucity and dysplasia were identified. In vitro studies combining CNI exposure and siRNA-mediated inhibition of NFATc revealed that calcineurin inhibition decreases HNF1B expression in epithelial cells but independent of NFATc. CONCLUSIONS Because HNF1B-related disease is a heterozygous condition, CNIs used to prevent rejection may induce reduced expression of the nonmutated allele of HNF1B leading to a superimposed defect of HNF-1β transcriptional activity. Taking into account the specific risk of posttransplantation diabetes mellitus and liver disorders in HNF1B patients, these findings advocate for in-depth characterization of pathways that regulate HNF1B and plead for considering individually tailored graft management that may include a CNI-free immunosuppressive regimen. Interventional studies will have to confirm this individualized approach.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Patients with HNF1B mutations develop progressive chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus (40-50%), and liver tests abnormalities (40-70%). In HNF1B patients who reach end-stage renal disease, single kidney transplantation (SKT) or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation can be considered. METHODS A retrospective multicenter study including 18 HNF1B patients receiving SKT or kidney-pancreas transplantation, and in vitro experiments including the characterization of the HNF1B expression after calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure. RESULTS After SKT, 50% of the HNF1B patients develop early posttransplantation diabetes mellitus, whereas 40% experience new-onset or severe worsening of preexisting abnormalities of liver tests, including severe cholestasis. In liver biopsies, disorders of the cholangiocytes primary cilium and various degrees of bile duct paucity and dysplasia were identified. In vitro studies combining CNI exposure and siRNA-mediated inhibition of NFATc revealed that calcineurin inhibition decreases HNF1B expression in epithelial cells but independent of NFATc. CONCLUSIONS Because HNF1B-related disease is a heterozygous condition, CNIs used to prevent rejection may induce reduced expression of the nonmutated allele of HNF1B leading to a superimposed defect of HNF-1β transcriptional activity. Taking into account the specific risk of posttransplantation diabetes mellitus and liver disorders in HNF1B patients, these findings advocate for in-depth characterization of pathways that regulate HNF1B and plead for considering individually tailored graft management that may include a CNI-free immunosuppressive regimen. Interventional studies will have to confirm this individualized approach.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:19 Feb 2016 08:11
Last Modified:09 Nov 2016 01:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0041-1337
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/TP.0000000000000993
PubMed ID:26555949

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