Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Renal oxygenation: preglomerular vasculature is an unlikely contributor to renal oxygen shunting


Olgac, Ufuk; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan (2015). Renal oxygenation: preglomerular vasculature is an unlikely contributor to renal oxygen shunting. American Journal of Physiology. Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, 308(7):F671-F688.

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to assess the plausibility of preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting in the kidney. To this end, we have developed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model that takes into account transport processes in arteries, veins, cortical tissue, and capillaries. Our model suggests that the amount of preglomerular oxygen shunting is negligible. Consequently, it is improbable that preglomerular shunting contributes to the hypothesized regulation of renal oxygenation. Cortical tissue oxygenation is more likely determined by the interplay between oxygen supply, either from the preglomerular vasculature or from capillaries, and oxygen consumption. We show that reported differences in permeability to oxygen between perfused and unperfused tissue may be explained by what we refer to as advection-facilitated diffusion. We further show that the preglomerular vasculature is the primary source of oxygen for the tissue when cortical consumption is high or renal arterial blood is highly oxygenated, i.e., under hyperoxemic conditions. Conversely, when oxygen demand in the tissue is decreased, or under hypoxemic conditions, oxygen is supplied predominantly by capillaries.

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to assess the plausibility of preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting in the kidney. To this end, we have developed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model that takes into account transport processes in arteries, veins, cortical tissue, and capillaries. Our model suggests that the amount of preglomerular oxygen shunting is negligible. Consequently, it is improbable that preglomerular shunting contributes to the hypothesized regulation of renal oxygenation. Cortical tissue oxygenation is more likely determined by the interplay between oxygen supply, either from the preglomerular vasculature or from capillaries, and oxygen consumption. We show that reported differences in permeability to oxygen between perfused and unperfused tissue may be explained by what we refer to as advection-facilitated diffusion. We further show that the preglomerular vasculature is the primary source of oxygen for the tissue when cortical consumption is high or renal arterial blood is highly oxygenated, i.e., under hyperoxemic conditions. Conversely, when oxygen demand in the tissue is decreased, or under hypoxemic conditions, oxygen is supplied predominantly by capillaries.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 08 Feb 2016
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2015
Deposited On:08 Feb 2016 09:57
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 18:26
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:1522-1466
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00551.2014
PubMed ID:25503734

Download