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Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): executive summary from a kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) controversies conference


Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Harris, Tess; Horie, Shigeo; Kasiske, Bertram L; Odland, Dwight; Pei, York; Perrone, Ronald D; Pirson, Yves; Schrier, Robert W; Torra, Roser; Torres, Vicente E; Watnick, Terry; Wheeler, David C (2015). Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): executive summary from a kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) controversies conference. Kidney International, 88(1):17-27.

Abstract

Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review.

Abstract

Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:16 Feb 2016 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:04
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0085-2538
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2015.59
PubMed ID:25786098

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