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As high as it gets: Ingroup projection processes in the superordinate group humans


Reese, Gerhard; Berthold, Anne; Steffens, Melanie C (2016). As high as it gets: Ingroup projection processes in the superordinate group humans. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 50:39-49.

Abstract

Recent research on inclusive identities suggests that the highly inclusive superordinate group “humans” is a relevant social category such that identification with all humans is related to various pro-social outcomes. In this research, we tested whether dual identity affects the extent to which the superordinate group humans serves as a relevant comparison standard for relations between developed and developing countries. Overall, participants from a developed country perceived their ingroup as more relatively prototypical for all humanity than people from developing countries. Study 1 revealed that relative prototypicality perceptions predicted weaker behavioral intentions to act against global inequality. In Studies 2 and 3, higher levels of relative prototypicality tended to predict fewer donations and a lower probability to seek fair trade information. Perceived legitimacy of global inequality explained the relation between relative prototypicality and donation behavior (Study 3). Dual identification with both developed countries and humanity did not predict relative prototypicality judgments. We discuss that the social representation of all humans can be a meaningful comparison standard for individuals, and we discuss the role of dual identity in international relations.

Abstract

Recent research on inclusive identities suggests that the highly inclusive superordinate group “humans” is a relevant social category such that identification with all humans is related to various pro-social outcomes. In this research, we tested whether dual identity affects the extent to which the superordinate group humans serves as a relevant comparison standard for relations between developed and developing countries. Overall, participants from a developed country perceived their ingroup as more relatively prototypical for all humanity than people from developing countries. Study 1 revealed that relative prototypicality perceptions predicted weaker behavioral intentions to act against global inequality. In Studies 2 and 3, higher levels of relative prototypicality tended to predict fewer donations and a lower probability to seek fair trade information. Perceived legitimacy of global inequality explained the relation between relative prototypicality and donation behavior (Study 3). Dual identification with both developed countries and humanity did not predict relative prototypicality judgments. We discuss that the social representation of all humans can be a meaningful comparison standard for individuals, and we discuss the role of dual identity in international relations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2016
Deposited On:29 Jan 2016 09:35
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 18:26
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0147-1767
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijintrel.2015.11.003

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