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An examination of the convergence between the conceptualization and the measurement of humor styles: A study of the construct validity of the Humor Styles Questionnaire


Heintz, Sonja; Ruch, Willibald (2015). An examination of the convergence between the conceptualization and the measurement of humor styles: A study of the construct validity of the Humor Styles Questionnaire. HUMOR: International Journal of Humor Research, 28(4):611-633.

Abstract

The Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ; Martin et al. 2003) was devel- oped using a construct-based scale construction approach to measure four humor styles, namely affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating. The present study investigates to what extent the HSQ scales converge with and represent the conceptualizations (i.e., the definitions and construct descrip- tions) of the four humor styles as outlined by Martin et al. (2003). To this end, 340 participants provided self-reports on the definitions, construct descriptions, and the 32 items of the HSQ. Two multitrait-multimethod analyses yielded a good convergence of the self-defeating humor style, yet for the affiliative, self- enhancing, and aggressive humor styles convergence was lower and they were partly mismatched. The discrimination between the humor styles was mostly supported with the exception of affiliative and self-enhancing. Further, the HSQ scales predicted about two-thirds of the reliable variance in the conceptualiza- tions in multiple regression analyses, so they represented several conceptual elements. Overall, these findings do only lend partial support for the conver- gence of the HSQ with the original conceptualization of the humor styles. If replicable, this implicates that either the constructs and model of the humor styles need to be adjusted or newly developed, or the HSQ does.

Abstract

The Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ; Martin et al. 2003) was devel- oped using a construct-based scale construction approach to measure four humor styles, namely affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating. The present study investigates to what extent the HSQ scales converge with and represent the conceptualizations (i.e., the definitions and construct descrip- tions) of the four humor styles as outlined by Martin et al. (2003). To this end, 340 participants provided self-reports on the definitions, construct descriptions, and the 32 items of the HSQ. Two multitrait-multimethod analyses yielded a good convergence of the self-defeating humor style, yet for the affiliative, self- enhancing, and aggressive humor styles convergence was lower and they were partly mismatched. The discrimination between the humor styles was mostly supported with the exception of affiliative and self-enhancing. Further, the HSQ scales predicted about two-thirds of the reliable variance in the conceptualiza- tions in multiple regression analyses, so they represented several conceptual elements. Overall, these findings do only lend partial support for the conver- gence of the HSQ with the original conceptualization of the humor styles. If replicable, this implicates that either the constructs and model of the humor styles need to be adjusted or newly developed, or the HSQ does.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:29 Jan 2016 10:11
Last Modified:15 Dec 2016 01:00
Publisher:De Gruyter
ISSN:0933-1719
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515/humor-2015-0095

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