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Overview of magnetic resonance imaging for management of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in everyday practice


Oreja-Guevara, C; Schippling, S (2015). Overview of magnetic resonance imaging for management of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in everyday practice. European Journal of Neurology, 22(S2):22-27.

Abstract

Although the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis/differential diagnosis of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) is widely accepted, adoption of MRI into clinical practice to monitor disease evolution remains a work in progress. However, an accumulating body of evidence points to a central role for MRI in managing patients with relapsing−remitting MS along the disease continuum. Routine MRI surveillance provides insight into disease activity that is not evident clinically and this information, in turn, can be used to inform prognosis and guide treatment decisions. In Europe, practical guidelines have been developed to reduce the heterogeneity of imaging (both intracentre and intercentre) and improve the quality of MRI assessment and interpretation. Aimed at the general neurologist, this review explores some of the issues associated with MRI and examines evidence supporting its use for routine monitoring of MS patients in everyday practice.

Abstract

Although the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis/differential diagnosis of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) is widely accepted, adoption of MRI into clinical practice to monitor disease evolution remains a work in progress. However, an accumulating body of evidence points to a central role for MRI in managing patients with relapsing−remitting MS along the disease continuum. Routine MRI surveillance provides insight into disease activity that is not evident clinically and this information, in turn, can be used to inform prognosis and guide treatment decisions. In Europe, practical guidelines have been developed to reduce the heterogeneity of imaging (both intracentre and intercentre) and improve the quality of MRI assessment and interpretation. Aimed at the general neurologist, this review explores some of the issues associated with MRI and examines evidence supporting its use for routine monitoring of MS patients in everyday practice.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:22 Feb 2016 13:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:05
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1351-5101
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ene.12800
PubMed ID:26374510

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