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Building late-type spiral galaxies by in-situ and ex-situ star formation


Pillepich, Annalisa; Madau, Piero; Mayer, Lucio (2015). Building late-type spiral galaxies by in-situ and ex-situ star formation. The Astrophysical Journal, 799(2):184.

Abstract

We analyze the formation and evolution of the stellar components in "Eris," a 120 pc resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of a late-type spiral galaxy. The simulation includes the effects of a uniform UV background, a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback, and a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold. It allows a detailed study of the relative contributions of "in-situ" (within the main host) and "ex-situ" (within satellite galaxies) star formation to each major Galactic component in a close Milky Way analog. We investigate these two star-formation channels as a function of galactocentric distance, along different lines of sight above and along the disk plane, and as a function of cosmic time. We find that: (1) approximately 70% of today's stars formed in-situ; (2) more than two thirds of the ex-situ stars formed within satellites after infall; (3) the majority of ex-situ stars are found today in the disk and in the bulge; (4) the stellar halo is dominated by ex-situ stars, whereas in-situ stars dominate the mass profile at distances <~ 5 kpc from the center at high latitudes; and (5) approximately 25% of the inner, r <~ 20 kpc, halo is composed of in-situ stars that have been displaced from their original birth sites during Eris' early assembly history.

Abstract

We analyze the formation and evolution of the stellar components in "Eris," a 120 pc resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of a late-type spiral galaxy. The simulation includes the effects of a uniform UV background, a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback, and a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold. It allows a detailed study of the relative contributions of "in-situ" (within the main host) and "ex-situ" (within satellite galaxies) star formation to each major Galactic component in a close Milky Way analog. We investigate these two star-formation channels as a function of galactocentric distance, along different lines of sight above and along the disk plane, and as a function of cosmic time. We find that: (1) approximately 70% of today's stars formed in-situ; (2) more than two thirds of the ex-situ stars formed within satellites after infall; (3) the majority of ex-situ stars are found today in the disk and in the bulge; (4) the stellar halo is dominated by ex-situ stars, whereas in-situ stars dominate the mass profile at distances <~ 5 kpc from the center at high latitudes; and (5) approximately 25% of the inner, r <~ 20 kpc, halo is composed of in-situ stars that have been displaced from their original birth sites during Eris' early assembly history.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:February 2015
Deposited On:22 Feb 2016 15:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:05
Publisher:Institute of Physics Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1538-4357
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/184
Other Identification Number:arXiv:1407.7855v1

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