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The emergence of epitheliocystis in the upper Rhone region: evidence for Chlamydiae in wild and farmed salmonid populations


Guevara Soto, Maricruz; Vidondo, Beatriz; Vaughan, Lloyd; Seth-Smith, Helena; Nufer, Lisbeth; Segner, Helmut; Rubin, J F; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike (2016). The emergence of epitheliocystis in the upper Rhone region: evidence for Chlamydiae in wild and farmed salmonid populations. Archives of Microbiology, 198(4):315-324.

Abstract

We present the first study comparing epitheliocystis in a wild and farmed salmonid in Europe. Sampling three tributaries to the Lake Geneva, including one from headwaters to river mouth, revealed an unequal distribution of epitheliocystis in brown trout (Salmo trutta). When evaluated histologically and comparing sites grouped as wild versus farm, the probability of finding infected trout is higher on farms. In contrast, the infection intensities, as estimated by the number of cysts per gill arch, were higher on average and showed maximum values in the wild trout. Sequence analysis showed the most common epitheliocystis agents were Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis, all clustering into a single clade, whereas Candidatus Clavichlamydia salmonicola sequences cluster in two closely related subspecies, of which one was mostly found in farmed fish and the other exclusively in wild brown trout, indicating that farms are unlikely to be the source of infections in wild trout. A detailed morphological analysis of cysts using transmission electron microscopy revealed unique features illustrating the wide divergence existing between Ca. P. salmonis and Ca. C. salmonicola within the phylum Chlamydiae.

Abstract

We present the first study comparing epitheliocystis in a wild and farmed salmonid in Europe. Sampling three tributaries to the Lake Geneva, including one from headwaters to river mouth, revealed an unequal distribution of epitheliocystis in brown trout (Salmo trutta). When evaluated histologically and comparing sites grouped as wild versus farm, the probability of finding infected trout is higher on farms. In contrast, the infection intensities, as estimated by the number of cysts per gill arch, were higher on average and showed maximum values in the wild trout. Sequence analysis showed the most common epitheliocystis agents were Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis, all clustering into a single clade, whereas Candidatus Clavichlamydia salmonicola sequences cluster in two closely related subspecies, of which one was mostly found in farmed fish and the other exclusively in wild brown trout, indicating that farms are unlikely to be the source of infections in wild trout. A detailed morphological analysis of cysts using transmission electron microscopy revealed unique features illustrating the wide divergence existing between Ca. P. salmonis and Ca. C. salmonicola within the phylum Chlamydiae.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Piscichlamydia salmonis, Clavichlamydia salmonicola, brown trout, Salmo trutta, epitheliocystis
Language:English
Date:January 2016
Deposited On:22 Feb 2016 18:27
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 18:48
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0302-8933
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00203-016-1192
PubMed ID:26802008

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