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Whole-body diffusion imaging applying simultaneous multi-slice excitation


Kenkel, D; Wurnig, M; Filli, L; Ulbrich, E; Runge, V M; Beck, T; Boss, A (2016). Whole-body diffusion imaging applying simultaneous multi-slice excitation. RöFo : Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Röntgenstrahlen und der bildgebenden Verfahren, 188(04):381-388.

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a fast protocol for whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) using a slice-accelerated echo-planar sequence, which, when using comparable image acquisition parameters, noticeably reduces measurement time compared to a conventional WB-DWI protocol. Materials and Methods: A single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence capable of simultaneous slice excitation and acquisition was optimized for WB-DWI on a 3 T MR scanner, with a comparable conventional WB-DWI protocol serving as the reference standard. Eight healthy individuals and one oncologic patient underwent WB-DWI. Quantitative analysis was carried out by measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its coefficient of variation (CV) in different organs. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists using a 4-point Likert scale. Results: Using our proposed protocol, the scan time of the WB-DWI measurement was reduced by up to 25.9 %. Both protocols, the slice-accelerated protocol and the conventional protocol, showed comparable image quality without statistically significant differences in the reader scores. Similarly, no significant differences of the ADC values of parenchymal organs were found, whereas ADC values of brain tissue were slightly higher in the slice-accelerated protocol. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that slice-accelerated DWI can be applied to WB-DWI protocols with the potential to greatly reduce the required measurement time, thereby substantially increasing clinical applicability. Key Points • Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) using simultaneous multi-slice and blipped-CAIPI reduces the measurement time strongly without having a significant impact on image quality.• The reduction in measurement time might strongly contribute to the clinical applicability of WB-DWI.• However, further refinement of the slice-accelerated EPI sequence, and the WB-DWI protocol applying this sequence type seems necessary; and the value of such WB-DWI protocols for assessment of systemic oncological diseases needs to be investigated in further clinical studies. Citation Format: • Kenkel D, Wurnig M, Filli L et al. Whole-Body Diffusion Imaging Applying Simultaneous Multi-Slice Excitation. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1567032.

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a fast protocol for whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) using a slice-accelerated echo-planar sequence, which, when using comparable image acquisition parameters, noticeably reduces measurement time compared to a conventional WB-DWI protocol. Materials and Methods: A single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence capable of simultaneous slice excitation and acquisition was optimized for WB-DWI on a 3 T MR scanner, with a comparable conventional WB-DWI protocol serving as the reference standard. Eight healthy individuals and one oncologic patient underwent WB-DWI. Quantitative analysis was carried out by measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its coefficient of variation (CV) in different organs. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists using a 4-point Likert scale. Results: Using our proposed protocol, the scan time of the WB-DWI measurement was reduced by up to 25.9 %. Both protocols, the slice-accelerated protocol and the conventional protocol, showed comparable image quality without statistically significant differences in the reader scores. Similarly, no significant differences of the ADC values of parenchymal organs were found, whereas ADC values of brain tissue were slightly higher in the slice-accelerated protocol. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that slice-accelerated DWI can be applied to WB-DWI protocols with the potential to greatly reduce the required measurement time, thereby substantially increasing clinical applicability. Key Points • Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) using simultaneous multi-slice and blipped-CAIPI reduces the measurement time strongly without having a significant impact on image quality.• The reduction in measurement time might strongly contribute to the clinical applicability of WB-DWI.• However, further refinement of the slice-accelerated EPI sequence, and the WB-DWI protocol applying this sequence type seems necessary; and the value of such WB-DWI protocols for assessment of systemic oncological diseases needs to be investigated in further clinical studies. Citation Format: • Kenkel D, Wurnig M, Filli L et al. Whole-Body Diffusion Imaging Applying Simultaneous Multi-Slice Excitation. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1567032.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:27 January 2016
Deposited On:23 Feb 2016 13:48
Last Modified:17 Aug 2016 03:07
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:1438-9010
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0035-1567032
Related URLs:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/125519/
PubMed ID:26815283

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