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“Our heads did not accept it”: development and nostalgia in Southeastern Anatolia


Wohlwend, Wolfgang (2015). “Our heads did not accept it”: development and nostalgia in Southeastern Anatolia. Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, 140:207-223.

Abstract

This article examines the role of collectively shared nostalgia after a development-induced loss in Halfeti, a town in Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. In 2000, part of Halfeti was flooded to form a dam reservoir as part of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP). The reservoir submerged part of the town’s residential area as well as a large complex of orchards that were an integral part of pre-dam life in Halfeti. Ten years later, Halfeti’s residents shared a nostalgic, idealised image of the past, dubbed as eski hali, the ‘old state’, in contrast to yeni hali, the ‘new state’, which they viewed as being highly unpredictable at both local and global levels. During my research, I found it apparent that the orchards had been central to the economic, social and emotional life of the inhabitants of Halfeti. They were an expression of the social relationships in Halfeti and, in memory, a projection of shared community ideals. This article examines the role of these orchards as mirrored in nostalgic narratives about the eski hali.

Abstract

This article examines the role of collectively shared nostalgia after a development-induced loss in Halfeti, a town in Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. In 2000, part of Halfeti was flooded to form a dam reservoir as part of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP). The reservoir submerged part of the town’s residential area as well as a large complex of orchards that were an integral part of pre-dam life in Halfeti. Ten years later, Halfeti’s residents shared a nostalgic, idealised image of the past, dubbed as eski hali, the ‘old state’, in contrast to yeni hali, the ‘new state’, which they viewed as being highly unpredictable at both local and global levels. During my research, I found it apparent that the orchards had been central to the economic, social and emotional life of the inhabitants of Halfeti. They were an expression of the social relationships in Halfeti and, in memory, a projection of shared community ideals. This article examines the role of these orchards as mirrored in nostalgic narratives about the eski hali.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:790 Sports, games & entertainment
390 Customs, etiquette & folklore
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Uncontrolled Keywords:memory, nostalgia, development, resettlement, Southeastern Anatolia Project, GAP, Turkey, Erinnerung, Nostalgie, Entwicklung, Umsiedlung, Südostanatolien, Anatolien, Türkei, Staudamm
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:29 Mar 2016 17:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:12
Publisher:Reimer
ISSN:0044-2666
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://www.reimer-mann-verlag.de (Publisher)
http://www.reimer-mann-verlag.de/controller.php?cmd=suche_rubrik&rubrik=93&verlag=4 (Publisher)
http://www.jstor.org/journal/zeitethn

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Embargo till: 2017-10-31

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