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Children and young people with perinatal HIV in Europe: epidemiological situation in 2014 and implications for the future


Judd, Ali; Collins, Intira; Lodi, Sara; Olson, Ashley; Pantazis, Nikos; del Amo, Julia; Duff, Charlotte; Gennotte, Anne-Francoise; Kristensen, Dennis; Ledergerber, Bruno; Nadal, David; Rojo Conejo, Pablo; Sabin, Caroline A; Saidi, Yacine; Salbol Brandt, Rikke; Termote, Monique; Thorne, Claire; Warszawski, Josiane; Gibb, Diana (2016). Children and young people with perinatal HIV in Europe: epidemiological situation in 2014 and implications for the future. Eurosurveillance, 21(10):20-26.

Abstract

Accurate ascertainment of the number of children living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is important to plan paediatric and adolescent health services. In Europe, the first generation of perinatally HIV-infected survivors are transferring to adult care and their health needs are unknown. We undertook an online survey of HIV cohort studies participating in the EuroCoord Network of Excellence to ascertain the number of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV) patients included, to compare it with those published by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and to assess the ability of countries to follow up pHIV patients after transfer to adult care. At the end of 2013, 16 countries in EuroCoord reported 8,229 pHIV patients in follow-up in cohorts, compared with 5,160 cumulative diagnoses reported by the ECDC in the same area. Follow-up of pHIV patients after transfer to adult care varied. It is likely that the number of diagnoses of perinatal HIV reported to ECDC is an underestimate, although this varies by country. Further work is needed to refine estimates and encourage follow-up in adult HIV cohorts to investigate long-term outcomes and improve the care of the next generation of children with HIV.

Abstract

Accurate ascertainment of the number of children living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is important to plan paediatric and adolescent health services. In Europe, the first generation of perinatally HIV-infected survivors are transferring to adult care and their health needs are unknown. We undertook an online survey of HIV cohort studies participating in the EuroCoord Network of Excellence to ascertain the number of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV) patients included, to compare it with those published by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and to assess the ability of countries to follow up pHIV patients after transfer to adult care. At the end of 2013, 16 countries in EuroCoord reported 8,229 pHIV patients in follow-up in cohorts, compared with 5,160 cumulative diagnoses reported by the ECDC in the same area. Follow-up of pHIV patients after transfer to adult care varied. It is likely that the number of diagnoses of perinatal HIV reported to ECDC is an underestimate, although this varies by country. Further work is needed to refine estimates and encourage follow-up in adult HIV cohorts to investigate long-term outcomes and improve the care of the next generation of children with HIV.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Europe; HIV; Surveillance; adolescent; cohort; paediatric
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:01 Apr 2016 17:03
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 19:20
Publisher:Centre Europeen pour la Surveillance Epidemiologique du SIDA
ISSN:1025-496X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.10.30162
PubMed ID:26988197

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