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Correlation between arthroscopy simulator and video game performance: a cross-sectional study of 30 volunteers comparing 2- and 3-dimensional video games


Jentzsch, Thorsten; Rahm, Stefan; Seifert, Burkhardt; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Werner, Clément M L; Bouaicha, Samy (2016). Correlation between arthroscopy simulator and video game performance: a cross-sectional study of 30 volunteers comparing 2- and 3-dimensional video games. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery, 32(7):1328-1334.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the association between arthroscopy simulator performance and video game skills.
METHODS: This study compared the performances of 30 volunteers without experience performing arthroscopies in 3 different tasks of a validated virtual reality knee arthroscopy simulator with the video game experience using a questionnaire and actual performances in 5 different 2- and 3-dimensional (D) video games of varying genres on 2 different platforms.
RESULTS: Positive correlations between knee arthroscopy simulator and video game performances (ρ = 0.63, P < .001) as well as experiences (ρ = 0.50, P = .005) were found. The strongest correlations were found for the task of catching (hooking) 6 foreign bodies (virtual rings; "triangulation") and the dribbling performance in a sports game and a first-person shooter game, as well as the meniscus resection and a tile-matching puzzle game (all ρ ≥ 0.60, P < .001). No correlations were found for any of the knee arthroscopy simulator tasks and a strategy game.
CONCLUSIONS: Although knee arthroscopy performances do not correlate with 2-D strategy video game skills, they show a correlation with 2-D tile-matching puzzle games only for easier tasks with a rather limited focus, and highly correlate with 3-D sports and first-person shooter video games. These findings show that experienced and good 3-D gamers are better arthroscopists than nonexperienced and poor 3-D gamers.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, observational cross-sectional study.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the association between arthroscopy simulator performance and video game skills.
METHODS: This study compared the performances of 30 volunteers without experience performing arthroscopies in 3 different tasks of a validated virtual reality knee arthroscopy simulator with the video game experience using a questionnaire and actual performances in 5 different 2- and 3-dimensional (D) video games of varying genres on 2 different platforms.
RESULTS: Positive correlations between knee arthroscopy simulator and video game performances (ρ = 0.63, P < .001) as well as experiences (ρ = 0.50, P = .005) were found. The strongest correlations were found for the task of catching (hooking) 6 foreign bodies (virtual rings; "triangulation") and the dribbling performance in a sports game and a first-person shooter game, as well as the meniscus resection and a tile-matching puzzle game (all ρ ≥ 0.60, P < .001). No correlations were found for any of the knee arthroscopy simulator tasks and a strategy game.
CONCLUSIONS: Although knee arthroscopy performances do not correlate with 2-D strategy video game skills, they show a correlation with 2-D tile-matching puzzle games only for easier tasks with a rather limited focus, and highly correlate with 3-D sports and first-person shooter video games. These findings show that experienced and good 3-D gamers are better arthroscopists than nonexperienced and poor 3-D gamers.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, observational cross-sectional study.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:19 March 2016
Deposited On:14 Apr 2016 16:56
Last Modified:27 Jan 2017 04:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-8063
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2015.12.047
PubMed ID:27006104

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