Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) differentially modulates speech perception in young and older adults


Rufener, Katharina Simone; Oechslin, Mathias S; Zaehle, Tino; Meyer, Martin (2016). Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) differentially modulates speech perception in young and older adults. Brain Stimulation, 9(4):560-565.

Abstract

Background: Normal aging is accompanied by a functional decline in processing temporal features of spoken language, such as Voice onset time (VOT). On an electrophysiological level, this finding is paralleled by altered patterns of gamma oscillations.
Objective: Using 40 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the bilateral auditory cortex, this study aims at compare the effect of tACS to modulate VOT-processing in samples of healthy young and older adults.
Methods: 25 healthy young (age 20 – 35 years) and 20 older adults (age 60 – 75 years) participated in this study. Presented with an auditory phoneme categorization task participants received 40 Hz and 6 Hz tACS on two consecutive sessions.
Results: While 40 Hz tACS diminished task accuracy in young adults, older adults benefitted from this stimulation resulting in a more precise phonetic categorization.
Conclusion: The results of the study are discussed with respect to the non-linear relationship between gamma oscillations in the vicinity of the auditory cortex and VOT-processing. The present findings are promising in the context of an intervention for subjects with impaired ability to process temporal acoustic features in the speech signal.

Abstract

Background: Normal aging is accompanied by a functional decline in processing temporal features of spoken language, such as Voice onset time (VOT). On an electrophysiological level, this finding is paralleled by altered patterns of gamma oscillations.
Objective: Using 40 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the bilateral auditory cortex, this study aims at compare the effect of tACS to modulate VOT-processing in samples of healthy young and older adults.
Methods: 25 healthy young (age 20 – 35 years) and 20 older adults (age 60 – 75 years) participated in this study. Presented with an auditory phoneme categorization task participants received 40 Hz and 6 Hz tACS on two consecutive sessions.
Results: While 40 Hz tACS diminished task accuracy in young adults, older adults benefitted from this stimulation resulting in a more precise phonetic categorization.
Conclusion: The results of the study are discussed with respect to the non-linear relationship between gamma oscillations in the vicinity of the auditory cortex and VOT-processing. The present findings are promising in the context of an intervention for subjects with impaired ability to process temporal acoustic features in the speech signal.

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Date:2016
Deposited On:13 Apr 2016 14:51
Last Modified:18 Jun 2016 01:03
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1876-4754
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2016.04.002

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations