Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

How do display design and user characteristics matter in animations? An empirical study with air traffic control displays


Maggi, Sara; Fabrikant, Sara I; Imbert, Jean-Paul; Hurter, Christophe (2016). How do display design and user characteristics matter in animations? An empirical study with air traffic control displays. Cartographica, 51(1):25-37.

Abstract

We detail an empirical animation study to assess how display design, user spatial ability, and training might influence visuospatial decision-making with animated displays showing aircraft movements. We present empirical results of a visuospatial detection task with moving objects, based on response accuracy and response time, including a descriptive eye-movement analysis. We found significant differences in a visuospatial detection task of moving objects across animation design types and domain expertise levels based on viewers' visuospatial skill differences. With this empirical approach, we hope to better understand how users explore and extract information from animated displays. Based on these results, we aim to further develop empirically validated animation display design guidelines to increase their efficiency and effectiveness for decision-making with and about moving objects.

Nous présentons en détail une expérimentation évaluant des tâches utilisateurs dans un contexte de visualisation dynamique représentant des mouvements d'avions sur une interface de contrôle aérien. Nous cherchons à évaluer l'influence des principes d'affichage et du niveau d'expertise sur les aptitudes spatiales des participants à prendre des décisions. L'évaluation est basée sur l'exactitude des réponses données, le temps de réponse, et analyse descriptive des mouvements oculaires (eye tracking). Nous constatons des différences significatives dans la détection visuelle et spatiale d'objets en mouvement, selon le type d'animation et le niveau d'expertise des utilisateurs. À l'aide de cette expérimentation, nous espérons mieux comprendre comment les utilisateurs examinent, interprètent et extraient des connaissances à partir d'affichages dynamiques. À partir de ces résultats, nous souhaitons dégager des principes directeurs qui nous permettrons d'améliorer la conception d'animation, nous cherchons ainsi à accroître l'efficacité dans les prises de décisions des utilisateurs considérant la visualisation d'objets en mouvement.

Abstract

We detail an empirical animation study to assess how display design, user spatial ability, and training might influence visuospatial decision-making with animated displays showing aircraft movements. We present empirical results of a visuospatial detection task with moving objects, based on response accuracy and response time, including a descriptive eye-movement analysis. We found significant differences in a visuospatial detection task of moving objects across animation design types and domain expertise levels based on viewers' visuospatial skill differences. With this empirical approach, we hope to better understand how users explore and extract information from animated displays. Based on these results, we aim to further develop empirically validated animation display design guidelines to increase their efficiency and effectiveness for decision-making with and about moving objects.

Nous présentons en détail une expérimentation évaluant des tâches utilisateurs dans un contexte de visualisation dynamique représentant des mouvements d'avions sur une interface de contrôle aérien. Nous cherchons à évaluer l'influence des principes d'affichage et du niveau d'expertise sur les aptitudes spatiales des participants à prendre des décisions. L'évaluation est basée sur l'exactitude des réponses données, le temps de réponse, et analyse descriptive des mouvements oculaires (eye tracking). Nous constatons des différences significatives dans la détection visuelle et spatiale d'objets en mouvement, selon le type d'animation et le niveau d'expertise des utilisateurs. À l'aide de cette expérimentation, nous espérons mieux comprendre comment les utilisateurs examinent, interprètent et extraient des connaissances à partir d'affichages dynamiques. À partir de ces résultats, nous souhaitons dégager des principes directeurs qui nous permettrons d'améliorer la conception d'animation, nous cherchons ainsi à accroître l'efficacité dans les prises de décisions des utilisateurs considérant la visualisation d'objets en mouvement.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 21 Apr 2016
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Uncontrolled Keywords:Animation, animation design, empirical cartography, expertise, training, spatial ability, eye tracker, air traffic control display
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:21 Apr 2016 14:32
Last Modified:21 Apr 2016 14:32
Publisher:University of Toronto Press
ISSN:0317-7173
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3138/cart.51.1.3176

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 230kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations