Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Feeding problems in preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers


Ersch, J; Baenziger, O; Bernet, V; Bucher, H U (2008). Feeding problems in preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 44(11):651-655.

Abstract

AIM: Maternal disease can cause prematurity and neonatal complications, notably feeding problems. To determine the relationship between maternal disease and the nature and severity of neonatal feeding problems, we compared feeding profiles, time to demand feeding and length of hospital stay between preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers, mothers with amniotic infection and mothers with other disease causing prematurity. METHODS: The retrospective study used labour ward data collected from 2002 to 2005 in a tertiary university centre to analyse three groups of singletons born at <32 completed gestational weeks to mothers with preeclampsia (n = 61), amniotic infection (n = 55) and non-preeclamptic non-amniotic infection controls (n = 55). The groups were similar in gestational age, birthweight and sex ratio; all infants received enteral feeding according to departmental guidelines. Feeding profiles and enteral/oral nutrition were compared. RESULTS: Feeding problems occurred in 46% of the preeclamptic group, 11% of the amniotic infection group and 13% of controls. Full oral demand feeding was established at 36 0/7 weeks postmenstrual age, 35 3/7 weeks (P = 0.03) and 35 2/7 weeks (P < 0.0001), respectively. Feeding problems were the main cause of delay (7-10 days) in hospital discharge in the preeclamptic group (P = 0.0002). CONCLUSIONS: Feeding problems are greater, and hospital stay longer, in preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers than in other preterm infants.

Abstract

AIM: Maternal disease can cause prematurity and neonatal complications, notably feeding problems. To determine the relationship between maternal disease and the nature and severity of neonatal feeding problems, we compared feeding profiles, time to demand feeding and length of hospital stay between preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers, mothers with amniotic infection and mothers with other disease causing prematurity. METHODS: The retrospective study used labour ward data collected from 2002 to 2005 in a tertiary university centre to analyse three groups of singletons born at <32 completed gestational weeks to mothers with preeclampsia (n = 61), amniotic infection (n = 55) and non-preeclamptic non-amniotic infection controls (n = 55). The groups were similar in gestational age, birthweight and sex ratio; all infants received enteral feeding according to departmental guidelines. Feeding profiles and enteral/oral nutrition were compared. RESULTS: Feeding problems occurred in 46% of the preeclamptic group, 11% of the amniotic infection group and 13% of controls. Full oral demand feeding was established at 36 0/7 weeks postmenstrual age, 35 3/7 weeks (P = 0.03) and 35 2/7 weeks (P < 0.0001), respectively. Feeding problems were the main cause of delay (7-10 days) in hospital discharge in the preeclamptic group (P = 0.0002). CONCLUSIONS: Feeding problems are greater, and hospital stay longer, in preterm infants of preeclamptic mothers than in other preterm infants.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 17 Feb 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2008
Deposited On:17 Feb 2009 19:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:56
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1034-4810
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1754.2008.01375.x
PubMed ID:18717769

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations